Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Pushing Methodological Boundaries by Encouraging Students to Use Their Languages in the Classroom

Abstract

My presentation focuses on pushing methodological boundaries by encouraging students to use their languages. This presentation is rooted in my dissertation study where I interviewed international students about their experiences in their courses. Students shared awful experiences they had with implied or explicit English-only policies. Many shared stories of being ridiculed or shamed as they used other languages in their courses. Based on these interviews, I changed my methodologies and began encouraging students to use their chosen languages. I found the rewards, far outweighed the risks involved (Jensen, 2018). I follow the advice of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC; 1974) which issued a statement that emphasizes this position: “We affirm strongly that teachers must have the experiences and training that will enable them to respect diversity and uphold the right of students to their own language.” While the CCCC Statement was originally intended to allow various English dialects to be allowed in and recognized as important within university courses, this statement also allows for various languages to be included. I strongly believe that students have the right to their own languages.

This presentation will include information about how multiple languages were used effectively in classes where the only shared language was English. I will include examples of what a multilingual course might include and propose a variety of methodological strategies that will help to move away from English-only policies.

Presentation Description

My presentation focuses on pushing methodological boundaries by encouraging students to use their languages. This presentation is rooted in my dissertation study where I interviewed international students about their experiences in their courses. Students shared awful experiences they had with implied or explicit English-only policies. Many shared stories of being ridiculed or shamed as they used other languages in their courses. Based on these interviews, I changed my methodologies and began encouraging students to use their chosen languages. I found the rewards, far outweighed the risks involved (Jensen, 2018). I follow the advice of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC; 1974) which issued a statement that emphasizes this position: “We affirm strongly that teachers must have the experiences and training that will enable them to respect diversity and uphold the right of students to their own language.” While the CCCC Statement was originally intended to allow various English dialects to be allowed in and recognized as important within university courses, this statement also allows for various languages to be included. I strongly believe that students have the right to their own languages. This presentation will include information about how multiple languages were used effectively in classes where the only shared language was English. I will include examples of what a multilingual course might include and propose a variety of methodological strategies that will help to move away from English-only policies.

Location

Stream B: Curriculum Dialogues

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 12th, 2:30 PM Jun 12th, 3:30 PM

Pushing Methodological Boundaries by Encouraging Students to Use Their Languages in the Classroom

Stream B: Curriculum Dialogues

My presentation focuses on pushing methodological boundaries by encouraging students to use their languages. This presentation is rooted in my dissertation study where I interviewed international students about their experiences in their courses. Students shared awful experiences they had with implied or explicit English-only policies. Many shared stories of being ridiculed or shamed as they used other languages in their courses. Based on these interviews, I changed my methodologies and began encouraging students to use their chosen languages. I found the rewards, far outweighed the risks involved (Jensen, 2018). I follow the advice of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC; 1974) which issued a statement that emphasizes this position: “We affirm strongly that teachers must have the experiences and training that will enable them to respect diversity and uphold the right of students to their own language.” While the CCCC Statement was originally intended to allow various English dialects to be allowed in and recognized as important within university courses, this statement also allows for various languages to be included. I strongly believe that students have the right to their own languages.

This presentation will include information about how multiple languages were used effectively in classes where the only shared language was English. I will include examples of what a multilingual course might include and propose a variety of methodological strategies that will help to move away from English-only policies.