Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Hauntings, Books, and “Others": A Journey Towards a Dissertation

Abstract

In a land where Spanish moss sways from oak trees, family Bibles and lineages are treasured and touted, and a twisted history remains ever-present, it is easy to imagine the nearness of ghosts, the company of haunts and haints. The conjured presence of specters has become both a source of revenue and entertainment. For most Southerners, ghosts are simply spectacles fashioned for the amusement of tourists.

Yet for a Georgia Southern University doctoral student, the arrival of apparitions in her qualitative research was far from expected. Learning to see their chains, hear their moans, and listen to their voices changed both the researcher and the research. Derrida suggests we “exorcise not in order to chase away the ghosts, but this time to grant them the right... to... a hospitable memory...out of concern for justice” (Avery, 2008, p. 58). Avery (2008) explains, “To be haunted in the name of a will to heal is to imagine what was lost which never even existed...If you let it, the ghost can lead you toward what has been missing, which is sometimes everything” (p. 58). This is a student's story of a haunted journey towards what was missing, which in our broken society today, turns out is everything.

Presentation Description

​In a land where Spanish moss sways from oak trees, family Bibles and lineages are treasured and touted, and a twisted history remains ever-present, it is easy to imagine the nearness of ghosts, the company of haunts and haints. The conjured presence of specters has become both a source of revenue and entertainment. For most Southerners, ghosts are simply spectacles fashioned for the amusement of tourists. Yet for a Georgia Southern University doctoral student, the arrival of apparitions in her qualitative research was far from expected. Learning to see their chains, hear their moans, and listen to their voices changed both the researcher and the research. Derrida suggests we “exorcise not in order to chase away the ghosts, but this time to grant them the right... to... a hospitable memory...out of concern for justice” (Avery, 2008, p. 58). Avery (2008) explains, “To be haunted in the name of a will to heal is to imagine what was lost which never even existed...If you let it, the ghost can lead you toward what has been missing, which is sometimes everything” (p. 58). This is a student's story of a haunted journey towards what was missing, which in our broken society today, turns out is everything.

Location

Stream C: Curriculum Dialogues

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Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 12th, 1:00 PM Jun 12th, 2:15 PM

Hauntings, Books, and “Others": A Journey Towards a Dissertation

Stream C: Curriculum Dialogues

In a land where Spanish moss sways from oak trees, family Bibles and lineages are treasured and touted, and a twisted history remains ever-present, it is easy to imagine the nearness of ghosts, the company of haunts and haints. The conjured presence of specters has become both a source of revenue and entertainment. For most Southerners, ghosts are simply spectacles fashioned for the amusement of tourists.

Yet for a Georgia Southern University doctoral student, the arrival of apparitions in her qualitative research was far from expected. Learning to see their chains, hear their moans, and listen to their voices changed both the researcher and the research. Derrida suggests we “exorcise not in order to chase away the ghosts, but this time to grant them the right... to... a hospitable memory...out of concern for justice” (Avery, 2008, p. 58). Avery (2008) explains, “To be haunted in the name of a will to heal is to imagine what was lost which never even existed...If you let it, the ghost can lead you toward what has been missing, which is sometimes everything” (p. 58). This is a student's story of a haunted journey towards what was missing, which in our broken society today, turns out is everything.