Presentation Title

Hypervisible Invisibility: Centering Black Girls in Critical Media Literacy

Type of Presentation

Individual presentation

Brief Description of Presentation

Keynote Address

Abstract of Proposal

This lecture will share how Black girls are both hypervisible and invisible in society, media and educational research. She will discuss how the deficit literature overwhelmingly supports an ideology that controlling the Black girl body offers the key to academic achievement while simultaneously neglecting the multiplicity of experience, the structural barriers to academic success, and the voices of Black girls themselves. This lecture will call on educational scholars to center Black girls in research and community engagement. Sherell A. McArthur, Ph.D. is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Theory and Practice at the University of Georgia with affiliated faculty membership with Women’s Studies and Critical Studies. Her research specializations include Black girls and identity, media literacy development of children and youth, popular culture as an educative site, and social justice education. As a former elementary school teacher and current community-engaged scholar, Sherell specializes in practitioner development through transformative pedagogical interventions and educational justice for Black girls.

Location

Grand Salon, DoubleTree

Start Date

2-22-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

2-22-2019 10:15 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 22nd, 9:00 AM Feb 22nd, 10:15 AM

Hypervisible Invisibility: Centering Black Girls in Critical Media Literacy

Grand Salon, DoubleTree

This lecture will share how Black girls are both hypervisible and invisible in society, media and educational research. She will discuss how the deficit literature overwhelmingly supports an ideology that controlling the Black girl body offers the key to academic achievement while simultaneously neglecting the multiplicity of experience, the structural barriers to academic success, and the voices of Black girls themselves. This lecture will call on educational scholars to center Black girls in research and community engagement. Sherell A. McArthur, Ph.D. is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Theory and Practice at the University of Georgia with affiliated faculty membership with Women’s Studies and Critical Studies. Her research specializations include Black girls and identity, media literacy development of children and youth, popular culture as an educative site, and social justice education. As a former elementary school teacher and current community-engaged scholar, Sherell specializes in practitioner development through transformative pedagogical interventions and educational justice for Black girls.