Presentation Title

Disarticulating mediated information about the earth through remix

Biographical Sketch

Theresa Redmond is an Associate Professor at Appalachian State University where she teaches face-to-face and online in both undergraduate and graduate programs within Media Studies and Teacher Education. Her research investigates how media and communication technologies impact literacy, fluency, teaching and learning, expression, and engagement. Currently, Theresa is exploring a range of topics in critical media literacy, including: media literacy assessment, ecomedia literacy, and nonlinear pedagogies for media literacy education. She serves as Associate Editor for the Journal of Media Literacy Education and on the Leadership Council of the National Association for Media Literacy Education.

Type of Presentation

Individual presentation

Brief Description of Presentation

In this presentation, I share current action research where I enact an ecomedia literacy (López, 2014) pedagogy in a college media literacy class. Students engage in critical media literacy as it pertains to issues of sustainability and the climate crisis through analysis, evaluation, research, and remix. Specifically, I invited students to disarticulate advertisements that featured the environment as a key part of the message and create remixed media as critical commentary. References López, A. (2014). Greening media education: Bridging media literacy with green cultural citizenship. Peter Lang. New York, NY.

Abstract of Proposal

While critical media literacy has historically confronted a range of social justice issues— including issues of sexism, racism, consumerism, and economics— teachers and scholars have yet to address the climate crisis by incorporating sustainability concerns as a focus in media literacy curricula. Likewise, scholarship illustrating that environmental education courses are responding to the influence of media on audiences’ understandings of the climate crisis is scarce. Yet, images of the environment are widely used in media messages, particularly in advertising, where their subtext typically functions to promote and reinforce anthropocentric narratives and ideologies. The construction of advertising media may have implications for how audiences perceive the planet and environmental concerns. In this action research study, I enact an ecomedia literacy (López, 2014) pedagogy in a college media literacy class by inviting students to disarticulate mediated information about the earth implicitly conveyed in advertising media. Through a scaffolded process of inquiry that comprised curation, analysis, evaluation, research, and production, students experiment in creating critical commentary by remixing commercials. Students’ media production work is transformative because they replace advertising content with environmentally-conscious counter narratives that were omitted from the original ads. Preliminary findings suggest that students experienced increased ownership and engagement of course content, actively learning about not only how media construct understandings of the environment, but also how they, as citizens, may participate in social discourse through remix.

References

López, A. (2014). Greening media education: Bridging media literacy with green cultural citizenship. Peter Lang. New York, NY.

Start Date

2-24-2018 2:50 PM

End Date

2-24-2018 4:20 PM

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Feb 24th, 2:50 PM Feb 24th, 4:20 PM

Disarticulating mediated information about the earth through remix

While critical media literacy has historically confronted a range of social justice issues— including issues of sexism, racism, consumerism, and economics— teachers and scholars have yet to address the climate crisis by incorporating sustainability concerns as a focus in media literacy curricula. Likewise, scholarship illustrating that environmental education courses are responding to the influence of media on audiences’ understandings of the climate crisis is scarce. Yet, images of the environment are widely used in media messages, particularly in advertising, where their subtext typically functions to promote and reinforce anthropocentric narratives and ideologies. The construction of advertising media may have implications for how audiences perceive the planet and environmental concerns. In this action research study, I enact an ecomedia literacy (López, 2014) pedagogy in a college media literacy class by inviting students to disarticulate mediated information about the earth implicitly conveyed in advertising media. Through a scaffolded process of inquiry that comprised curation, analysis, evaluation, research, and production, students experiment in creating critical commentary by remixing commercials. Students’ media production work is transformative because they replace advertising content with environmentally-conscious counter narratives that were omitted from the original ads. Preliminary findings suggest that students experienced increased ownership and engagement of course content, actively learning about not only how media construct understandings of the environment, but also how they, as citizens, may participate in social discourse through remix.

References

López, A. (2014). Greening media education: Bridging media literacy with green cultural citizenship. Peter Lang. New York, NY.