Presentation Title

Expanding an iFREE Student”s Biochemical Toolkit

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Michele McGibony

Faculty Mentor Email

mdavis@georgiasouthern.edu

Presentation Type and Release Option

Research Poster Presentation (File Not Available for Download)

Location

COUR Symposium 2021

Presentation Year

2021

Start Date

4-19-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

April 2021

Abstract

Caspases are a family of protease enzymes beneficial in apoptosis, commonly referred to as programmed cell death, for normal cell function. However, suppression of programmed cell death is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. If the process of apoptosis is not completed, cancer and other diseases may be a result, and when apoptosis is overactive, several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease may occur. Our project’s purpose is to determine whether or not metal ions such as iron and calcium or metalloproteins such as cytochrome c can inhibit or activate these caspases to control cell death, in the hopes of application for cancer studies and other neurodegenerative disorders. This study requires many biochemical techniques and knowledge beyond the scope of a novice student. Therefore, a complete study of biochemical techniques and basic protein/enzyme relationships were investigated by an iFREE student prior to embarking on the caspase metalloprotein project. This presentation will showcase the techniques, instrumentation, and knowledge the student has gained in the past year in the area of biochemistry and molecular biology.

Academic Unit

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

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Apr 19th, 12:00 AM Apr 20th, 12:00 AM

Expanding an iFREE Student”s Biochemical Toolkit

COUR Symposium 2021

Caspases are a family of protease enzymes beneficial in apoptosis, commonly referred to as programmed cell death, for normal cell function. However, suppression of programmed cell death is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. If the process of apoptosis is not completed, cancer and other diseases may be a result, and when apoptosis is overactive, several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease may occur. Our project’s purpose is to determine whether or not metal ions such as iron and calcium or metalloproteins such as cytochrome c can inhibit or activate these caspases to control cell death, in the hopes of application for cancer studies and other neurodegenerative disorders. This study requires many biochemical techniques and knowledge beyond the scope of a novice student. Therefore, a complete study of biochemical techniques and basic protein/enzyme relationships were investigated by an iFREE student prior to embarking on the caspase metalloprotein project. This presentation will showcase the techniques, instrumentation, and knowledge the student has gained in the past year in the area of biochemistry and molecular biology.