Title

How to Cultivate Culturally Competent Counselors: Integrated Curiosity Supervision Model

Conference Strand

Teaching, Training, and Supervision

Abstract

For decades, researchers and counselor educators have emphasized the importance of developing counselors prepared to serve a diverse society, however, there is still much debate around which factors cultivate culturally competent counselors. Fostering curiosity in the supervisory relationship may assist with cultural openness, clinical exploration, counselor self-regulation, and strengthen the working alliance for improved supervision and therapeutic outcomes.

Description

Clinical supervision is the signature pedagogy of the mental health profession (Bernard & Goodyear, 2014). Loganbill, Hardy & Delworth (1982) described supervision as an intensive, interpersonally focused, one on one relationship where one person is designated to facilitate the development of therapeutic competence in another (pg. 4). While Bernard’s (1979, 1997) discrimination model and cognitive/psychosocial developmental models are widely known and utilized, each model has strengths and limitations when exercised with supervisees from diverse backgrounds with unique scenarios presented in clinical supervision. While both the discrimination and developmental models support the needs of the supervisee, both models fail to mention the role of curiosity to facilitate growth and competence in supervisees, or ease for the transition between roles of teacher, consultant, and counselor for supervisors. The proposed supervision model seeks to provide support for the integration of curiosity to meet the supervisory objectives of both the discrimination and developmental models for an egalitarian approach of support for both the supervisee and supervisor. Empirical evidence will be presented in support of fostering curiosity in the supervisory relationship across the discrimination and developmental models to facilitate cultural openness, exploration, self-regulation, and strengthen the working alliance for improved supervision and therapeutic outcomes. This presentation will present attendees with a theoretical foundation of curiosity, the discrimination and developmental supervision models, and an integrated curiosity supervision model for counselor educators and supervisors.

Presentation will be multimodal including multimedia presentation and demonstration of supervision model in practice with counselor-in-training (previously recorded); attendees will have the opportunity to learn and practice new supervision techniques during role-play and will receive handouts with empirical resources and activities to foster curiosity and cultural openness in supervision with counselors-in-training.

Evidence

Bernard, J. M., & Goodyear, R. K. (2014). Fundamentals of clinical supervision (5th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Borders, L. D., & Brown, L.L. (2005). The new handbook of counseling supervision. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.

Cooper, A., & Witenberg, E. G. (1984). Stimulation of curiosity in the supervisory process. In Clinical perspectives on the supervision of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy (pp. 59-74). Springer, Boston, MA.

Comstock, D. L., Hammer, T. R., Strentzsch, J., Cannon, K., Parsons, J., & II, G. S. (2008). Relational‐cultural theory: A framework for bridging relational, multicultural, and social justice competencies. Journal of Counseling & Development, 86(3), 279-287.

Crockett, J. & Hays, D. (2015). The influence of supervisor multicultural competence on the supervisory working alliance, supervisee counseling self-efficacy, and supervisee satisfaction with supervision: A mediation model. Counselor Education & Supervision, 54, 258-273.

D'Andrea, M., & Daniels, J. (1992). Measuring Ego Development for Counseling Practice: Implementing Developmental Eclecticism. Journal of Humanistic Education and Development, 31(1), 12-21.

Litman, J.A. (2005). Curiosity and the pleasures of learning: Wanting and liking new information. Cognition and Emotion, 19, 793-814.

Litman, J. A., & Pezzo, M. V. (2007). Dimensionality of interpersonal curiosity. Personality and Individual Differences, 43, 1448–1459.

Litman, J. A., Robinson, O. C., & Demetre, J. (2017). Intrapersonal curiosity: Inquisitiveness about the inner-self. Self and Identity, 16, 231-250.

Loganbill, C., Hardy, E., & Delworth, U. (1982). Supervision: A conceptual model. The Counseling Psychologist, 10(1), 3-42.

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Amber S. Haley, M.S., LPC (TX), LCDC-I (TX), NCC:

Amber S. Haley is currently a doctoral student in the Counselor Education and Supervision program at The University of Central Florida. Amber completed her master’s degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling at Syracuse University. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor Intern in the State of Texas. Her research interests include multicultural counseling competencies, the impact of intersectionality on an individual's healthy identity development and mental wellness, and the advancement of traditionally underserved and underrepresented persons from a worldview that sees them as central rather than marginal to healthy human civilization. Amber is an AACTE Holmes Scholar, and is an active member of the American Counseling Association (ACA), the Association for Counselor Education & Supervision (ACES), Chi Sigma Iota International Honor Society (CSI), and the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD). Amber currently serves as the National President of the AACTE Holmes Scholars program, and Assistant to the Editor for the Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling.

Gelawdiyos Haile is currently a doctoral student in the Counselor Education and Supervision program at The University of Central Florida. Gelawdiyos completed his master’s degree in Mental Health Counseling at Southeastern University. His research interests include addiction counseling, multicultural counseling, human performance, and interpersonal neurobiology (IPNB) in counseling. Gelawdiyos is an active member of the American Counseling Association (ACA), the Association for Counselor Education & Supervision (ACES), the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD), the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP), and the Professional Tennis Registry (PTR).

M. Ann Shillingford, Ph.D., commonly referred to as Dr. S by most of her students, is an Associate Professor of Counselor Education at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, Florida. She currently serves as coordinator of the counselor education Ph.D. program at UCF. She has several years of experience as a professional school counselor prior to completing her doctorate at the University of Central Florida. Dr. Shillingford has written several articles and book chapters on multicultural issues particularly focused on disparities among of color. Dr. Shillingford has a keen interest in exploring measures to deconstruct educational, social, and health disparities among marginalized communities. Dr. Shillingford is currently conducting research exploring the effects of media exposure to police and community violence on the physical and mental health of African American mothers raising young black men. She also facilitates a study abroad program with counseling students to the island of Dominica, exploring the multicultural competence of counseling students through a cultural immersion experience. Dr. Shillingford also serves as coordinator for the UCF National Holmes Scholar program (NHS). The NHS is a mentoring program to support students from underrepresented groups in higher education.

Location

Session One Breakouts: Hampton B

Start Date

2-7-2020 10:15 AM

End Date

2-7-2020 11:30 AM

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Feb 7th, 10:15 AM Feb 7th, 11:30 AM

How to Cultivate Culturally Competent Counselors: Integrated Curiosity Supervision Model

Session One Breakouts: Hampton B

For decades, researchers and counselor educators have emphasized the importance of developing counselors prepared to serve a diverse society, however, there is still much debate around which factors cultivate culturally competent counselors. Fostering curiosity in the supervisory relationship may assist with cultural openness, clinical exploration, counselor self-regulation, and strengthen the working alliance for improved supervision and therapeutic outcomes.