Title

Culturally Infused Optimal Recovery: A Developmental Wellness Approach

Conference Strand

Research and Theory

Abstract

Active substance abuse impacts every aspect of an individual’s life, most often resulting in a lower quality of life (QOL). Current treatment approaches may ineffectively focus on relapse prevention and place minimal attention on enhancing clients’ lives. This presentation shares techniques that refuel diverse clientele suffering from substance abuse issues and helps them to improve their coping skills and QOL

Description

Substance abuse experts point out that over indulgence and dependence on drugs and alcohol may be attributed to interactions abusers have with the environment, genetics, and neurobiology (Kincaid & Sullivan, 2010). In spite of this understanding, some existing approaches, especially those that are not culturally attuned and prescriptive in nature, fail to promote autonomy or help clients make healthy choices. Despite this lack of awareness, researchers have examined the impact of active substance use on the abuser, especially as it relates to one having a lower quality of life (QOL) (Donovan, Mattson, Cisler, Longabaugh, & Zweben, 2005; Laudet, Becker, & White, 2009; Laudet, 2011).

These objectives of this presentation are to: a) highlight Indivisible Self Model of Wellness (IS-Wel) (Myers & Sweeney, 2005)as a viable framework that promotes mental wellbeing and optimal functioning for individuals in recovery across cultural domains; b) promote developmental decision making; and c) showcase how IS-WEL activities may systemically be used to build clients’ recovery capital, maintain QOL, and sustain sobriety.

Current treatment approaches focus on relapse prevention with little effort placed upon enhancing clients’ lives. If recovery is a journey of hope, empowerment, and finding purpose, it behooves us to follow the recommendation of McKay (2017)who proffers that recovery treatments should extend beyond prevention.The presenters will discuss how the utilization of IS-Wel as a foundation integrated with the four domains of the Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling Competencies (MSJCC) 1) counselor self-awareness; 2) client worldview; 3) counseling relationship; and 4) counseling and advocacy interventions (Ratts, Singh, Nassar‐McMillan, Butler, & McCullough, 2016)mayhelp counselors conceptualize their client in a holistic way. We will provide attendees with the tools necessary to help diverse clientsimprove upon their coping skills as well as their QOL through promoting autonomy and diversity within the recovery process.

Evidence

Reference

Donovan, D., Mattson, M. E., Cisler, R. A., Longabaugh, R., & Zweben, A. (2005). Quality of Life as an Outcome Measure in Alcoholism Treatment Research. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 66(4), 119–139.

Kincaid, H., & Sullivan, J. A. (n.d.). Medical Models of Addiction. What Is Addiction?, 352–376.

Laudet, A. B. (2011). The Case for Considering Quality of Life in Addiction Research and Clinical Practice. Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, 6(1), 44–55.

Laudet, A. B., Becker, J. B., & White, W. L. (2009). Don’t Wanna Go Through That Madness No More: Quality of Life Satisfaction as Predictor of Sustained Remission from Illicit Drug Misuse. Substance Use & Misuse, 44(2), 227–252. doi.org/10.1080/10826080802714462

McKay, J. R. (2017). Making the hard work of recovery more attractive for those with substance use disorders. Addiction, 112(5), 751–757. doi.org/10.1111/add.13502

Myers, J. E., & Sweeney, T. J. (2005). The Indivisible Self: An evidence-based model of welIness (reprint). Journal of Individual Psychology, 61(3), 269–279.

Ratts, M. J., Singh, A. A., Nassar‐McMillan, S., Butler, S. K., & McCullough, J. R. (2016). Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling Competencies: Guidelines for the counseling profession. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 44(1), 28–48. doi.org/10.1002/jmcd.12035

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Gelawdiyos Haile completed his master’s degree in Mental Health Counseling at Southeastern University. He is a registered mental health intern and a second-year doctoral student at the University of Central Florida. His research interests include addiction counseling, multicultural counseling, human performance, and interpersonal neurobiology (IPNB) in counseling. Gelawdiyos is an active member of the American Counseling Association (ACA), the Association for Counselor Education & Supervision (ACES), the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD), the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP), and the Professional Tennis Registry (PTR).

S. Kent Butler, Jr. holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology, with a concentration in Counseling Psychology, from the University of Connecticut. Dr. Butler is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), Nationally Certified Counselor (NCC), and Nationally Certified School Counselor (NCSC). He is a full professor and currently serves as Interim Chief Equity, Inclusion and Diversity Officer at University of Central Florida. Dr. Butler also serves as the Principal Investigator, for The High-Risk Delinquent and Dependent Child Educational Research Project: Situational Environmental Circumstances Mentoring Program (SEC), which is a partnership between the University of Central Florida and several Florida universities. On the national level, Dr. Butler has served the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD) as the 2011 – 2012 President and American Counseling Association (ACA) Governing Council Representative (2015 – 2018). He is honored to be a member of AMCD’s Multicultural Counseling Competencies Revisions Committee (2014 – 2015) which produced the newly endorsed Multicultural Social Justice Counseling Competencies (MSJCC). Dr. Butler was bestowed with an ACA Fellow Award in April of 2016. His research and academic interests lie in the areas of Multicultural Counseling, Social Justice, Mentoring, Counseling work as it relates specifically to African American males, Group Counseling, School Counseling, and Multicultural Supervision.

Amber Haley completed her master’s degree in Mental Health Counseling at Syracuse University. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor Intern in the State of Texas. Her research interests include multicultural counseling competencies, the impact of intersectionality on an individual's heathy identity development and mental wellness, and the advancement of traditionally underserved and underrepresented persons from a worldview that sees them as central rather than marginal to healthy human civilization. Amber is an AACTE Holmes Scholar and is an active member of the American Counseling Association (ACA), the Association for Counselor Education & Supervision (ACES), Chi Sigma Iota International Honor Society (CSI), and the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD).

Location

Session Five Breakouts: Hampton B

Start Date

2-8-2020 10:00 AM

End Date

2-8-2020 11:15 AM

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Feb 8th, 10:00 AM Feb 8th, 11:15 AM

Culturally Infused Optimal Recovery: A Developmental Wellness Approach

Session Five Breakouts: Hampton B

Active substance abuse impacts every aspect of an individual’s life, most often resulting in a lower quality of life (QOL). Current treatment approaches may ineffectively focus on relapse prevention and place minimal attention on enhancing clients’ lives. This presentation shares techniques that refuel diverse clientele suffering from substance abuse issues and helps them to improve their coping skills and QOL