Title

Listen to the music: Training counselors through the use of music.

Conference Strand

Teaching, Training, and Supervision

Abstract

This presentation will discuss the use of music as a tool to enhance awareness, knowledge, and skills for counselors-in-training. First, presenters will briefly review the effects of music on the brain and on learning. Next, presenters will demonstrate how songs and reflective discussion can stimulate learning. Diverse cognitive styles, learning styles, and micro-counseling techniques will be considered during these reflective activities.

Description

Counselor educators routinely seek new and fresh ways to enhance learning for counselors and counselors-in-training living in a diverse digital world. One way in which counselors and counselors-in-training can practice reflective listening and enhance skill acquisition is through the use of music. According to Berk (2008), research demonstrates that music can stimulate the left and right hemispheres of the brain which, in turn, positively impacts learning. Essentially, the act of listening to music can be an emotional experience that elicits memory and promotes communication between brain hemispheres. While research supports the notion of music affecting the brain in ways that enhance learning, there is a paucity of research regarding the use of music as a tool to facilitate learning for students in higher education (Berk, 2008). However, Berk provides anecdotal evidence supporting the use of music as a tool to enrich learning in higher education (2001; 2008). Meanwhile, some counselor educators have utilized song lyrics as a strategy to effectively develop reflective listening skills for counselors-in-training (Davis & Pereira, 2016). In our experience, students report that the use of music provides realistic and enjoyable opportunities that enhance understanding and skill acquisition. It is our goal to provide rationale for using music as a teaching strategy to enhance the professional development of counselors and counselors-in-training. Research related to the effects of music on the brain and learning will be briefly discussed; however, the main focus of the presentation will involve specific songs, lyrics, and reflective activities that offer tools through which counselors and counselors-in-training can enhance awareness, knowledge, and skills.

Evidence

There is a paucity of research regarding the use of music as a tool to enhance the professional development of counselors and counselors-in-training. However, the notion of using music as a teaching strategy has been incorporated with college students and the use of lyrics has been utilized by counselors-in-trainings (Berk, 2001; Berk, 2008; Davis & Pereira, 2016). Overall, the notion of using music as a teaching strategy for training counselors is an effective technique that can easily be utilized in a digital world. Currently, I use music as a tool through which counselor education students can gain awareness, knowledge, and skills. Students report that this strategy provides realistic and enjoyable opportunities that enhance understanding and skill acquisition. The following resources provide support regarding the use of music as a teaching strategy:

Davis, E. S. & Pereira, J. (2016). Using song lyrics to enhance counselor trainee

perceptions of their reflective listening skills. Educational and

Psychological Studies Faculty Publications, 164.
 Retrieved at

http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/esf_facpub/164

Berk, R. A. (2001). Using music with demonstrations to trigger laughter and facilitate

learning in multiple intelligences. Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, 12(1),

97–107.

Berk, R. A. (2008). Music and music technology in college teaching: Classical to hip

hop across the curriculum. International Journal of Technology in Teaching and

Learning, 4(1), 45–67.

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Richard G. Deaner is Associate Professor and Program Coordinator of Counselor Education at Augusta University (AU). Deaner earned his Ph.D. in Counselor Education from the University of South Carolina and has extensive experience as a Licensed Professional Counselor working with diverse children, families, and LPC supervisees in schools and community settings. Meanwhile, Deaner is active in scholarship related to diversity, assessment, and wellness. In addition, Deaner was awarded the USG Regents’ Teaching Excellence Award in 2016 and ACA Counselor Educator Advocacy Award in 2017.

Kathryn L. Towns is an M.Ed. candidate enrolled in the Counselor Education Program at Augusta University (AU). She earned her B.S. from the University of Georgia. She is the Vice-President for AU’s chapter of Chi Sigma Iota (International Counseling Honor Society) and regularly participates with community projects, professional development, and scholarship. Ms. Towns plans to pursue a doctorate and become a Licensed Professional Counselor in the near future.

Location

PARB 227

Start Date

2-8-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

2-8-2019 5:15 PM

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Feb 8th, 4:00 PM Feb 8th, 5:15 PM

Listen to the music: Training counselors through the use of music.

PARB 227

This presentation will discuss the use of music as a tool to enhance awareness, knowledge, and skills for counselors-in-training. First, presenters will briefly review the effects of music on the brain and on learning. Next, presenters will demonstrate how songs and reflective discussion can stimulate learning. Diverse cognitive styles, learning styles, and micro-counseling techniques will be considered during these reflective activities.