Title

Perpetuating Invisibility: Examining the Relationship Between African American Men and Law Enforcement

Conference Strand

Research and Theory

Abstract

The relationship between law enforcement and the African American community has been strained by practices preventing healthy engagement between communities. This study assesed the perception of the relationship between law enforcement as an institution and African American males. The study examined the effects of the relationship and how African American males cope with and process their relationship between law enforcement.

Description

The attention given to the tension between law enforcement and the African American male community has increased in recent years with high profile deaths within the African American community at the hands of law enforcement. This session will discuss the findings of a recent pilot study completed by the presenter that assessed the perception of the relationship between law enforcement as an institution and African American males. The factors that contribute to the development of this perception of law enforcement were assessed. The effects of this relationship and how African American males cope with and process their relationship between law enforcement were examined. Utilizing the voice of color thesis, this study explored the contentious relationship from the African American male perspective. This session will highlight participant responses that show how persistent marginalization has a detrimental impact on the relationship law enforcement has with the african american community. Invisibility Syndrome is the result of persistent marginalization, stereotyping, and discrimination. The recepient of these racial slights starts to believe that their true personality and the things that make them unique are invisble to the world (Franklin & Boyd-Franklin, 2000). This session will highlight participants’ self reported thoughts and emotions that demonstrate how persistent marginalization hinders healthy engagement and reinforces the invisibility african american men experience. Through these responses you are invited to critically examine the complexities of the relationship between law enforcement and African American men.

Evidence

Brooks, M., Ward, C., Euring, M., Townsend, C., White, N., & Hughes, K. L. (2016). Is There a Problem Officer? Exploring the Lived Experience of Black Men and Their Relationship with Law Enforcement. Journal of African American Studies, 346-362.

Brooms, D. R., & Perry, A. R. (2016). “It’s Simply Because We’re Black Men”: Black Men’s Experiences and Responses to the Killing of Black Men. Journal of Men's Studies , 166-184.

Carr, P. J., Napolitano, L., & Keating, J. (2007). We Never Call the Cops and Here is Why: A Qualitative Examination of Legal Cynicism in Three Philadelphia Neighborhoods. Journal of Criminology, 445-480.

Delgado, R., & Stefancic, J. (2017). Critical Race Theory: An Itroduction .New York: New York University Press.

Franklin, A. J., & Boyd-Franklin, N. (2000). Invisibility Syndrome: A Clinical Model of the Effecs of Racism on African American Males. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 33-42.

Fridell, L., & Lim, H. (2016). Assessing the Racial Aspects of Police Force Using the Implicit- and Counter-Bias Perspectives. Journal of Criminal Justice, 36-48.

Haskins, N. H., & Singh, A. (2015). Critical Race Theory and Counselor Education Pedagogy: Creating Equitable Training. Counselor Education & Supervision, 288-301.

Pegues, J. (2017). Black and Blue. Public Administration Review, 164–165.

Robinson, M. A. (2017). Black Bodies on the Ground: Policing Disparities in the African American Community— An Analysis of Newsprint From January 1, 2015, Through December 31, 2015. Journal of Black Studies , 551-571.

Sidanius, J., Pratto, F., van Laar, C., & Levin, S. (2004). Social Dominance Theory: Its Agenda and Method. Political Psychology, 835-880.

Simpson, R. (2017). The Police Officer Perception Project: An Experimental Evaluation of Factors that Impact Perceptions of Police. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 393-415.

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Bredell Moody is a second-year doctoral student in the Educational Leadership, Policy and Human Development (ELPHD) Counselor Education program at NC State. He is graduate assistant at the NC State Counseling Center as an Academic Counselor. He is a Licensed Professional Counselor Associate (LPCA), National Certified Counselor (NCC), a member of the Nu Sigma Chi chapter of Chi Sigma Iota International Honor Society of Counseling (CSI) in the state of North Carolina. He received his Masters of Education in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from UNC Pembroke in December of 2016. He has worked in outpatient mental health settings working predominantly with economically-disadvantaged minority clients. Current research interests include social justice, black identity development, and empathy development.

Location

ELAB 38

Start Date

2-8-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

2-8-2019 5:15 PM

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Feb 8th, 4:00 PM Feb 8th, 5:15 PM

Perpetuating Invisibility: Examining the Relationship Between African American Men and Law Enforcement

ELAB 38

The relationship between law enforcement and the African American community has been strained by practices preventing healthy engagement between communities. This study assesed the perception of the relationship between law enforcement as an institution and African American males. The study examined the effects of the relationship and how African American males cope with and process their relationship between law enforcement.