Title

Processing the process: A multicultural self-awareness group in multicultural counselor training

Conference Strand

Teaching, Training, and Supervision

Abstract

With many strategies designed to foster multicultural counseling awareness, this session addresses the utility of a process group in a multicultural counseling course, including the group’s purpose, structure, and procedures. The presenters will share experiences of facilitating the group, describe benefits of “processing the process,” present critical incidents identified by students, and discuss strategies for implementation.

Description

Multicultural self-awareness can be understood as the foundational cornerstone of multicultural counseling competence. The multicultural counseling competence model of awareness, knowledge and skill is arranged in a developmental sequence as it is impossible for students to skillfully implement the “how” if they do not understand the “what” of privilege, oppression and identity. As a part of a multicultural counseling class in a CACREP-accredited counselor education program, the presenters implemented a self-awareness process group, facilitated by the class instructor, a doctoral counselor education student, and a Master’s counselor education student. The facilitators met following each group session to discuss their and student group members’ experiences during the session. In “processing the process,” each facilitator identified strengths, challenges, and areas of personal and professional growth for the students and for themselves. Upon completion of the group, students were asked to share a critical incident from the experience with a range of responses, many suggesting a unique space in which they could reflect on their cultural selves, hear others’ perspectives, and engage in honest dialogue. This preliminary data supports existing literature regarding the efficacy of process groups, but extends this concept by exploring the parallel process occurring in the group facilitators.

In a combined lecture and panel discussion format, the presenters will: (a) share an overview of the class in terms of the tripartite model of multicultural counseling competence; (b) describe the group’s purpose, structure, and procedures; (c) share experiences in facilitating the group; (d) share experiences from the facilitator processing group; and (e) open discussion to the audience for questions. Attendees will gain knowledge of the practical strategies of developing and implementing a self-awareness process group, identify critical incidents and outcomes associated with the group, and explore strategies for enhancing multicultural counseling self-awareness.

Evidence

Coleman, M. N. (2006). Critical incidents in multicultural training: An examination of student experiences. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 34, 168-182.

Collins, N. M., & Pieterse, A. (2007). Critical incident analysis based training: An approach for developing active racial/cultural awareness. Journal of Counseling & Development, 85, 14-23.

Greene, J. H., Barden, S. M., Richardson, E. D., & Hall, K. G. (2014). The influence of film and experiential pedagogy on multicultural counseling self-efficacy and multicultural counseling competence. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 14(5), 63-78.

Johnson, J. M., & Lambie, G. W. (2012). A multicultural personal growth group as a pedagogical strategy with graduate counseling students. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 12(3), 125-141.

Johnson, J. M., & Lambie, G. W. (2013). Ethnic identity and social-cognitive maturity in a multicultural group experience. Counselor Education & Supervision, 52, 193-206.

Leonard, P. J. (1996). Consciousness-raising groups as a multicultural awareness approach: An experience with counselor trainees. Cultural Diversity & Mental Health, 2(2), 89-98.

Yoon, E., Jérémie-Brink, G., & Kordesh, K. (2014). Critical issues in teaching a multicultural counseling course. International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling, 36, 359-371.

Format

Panel Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Adrienne Erby, Ph.D., LPC, NCC is an Assistant Professor of Counselor Education at Ohio University. She holds Master’s and doctoral degrees in Counseling from Oklahoma State University and The University of North Carolina at Charlotte respectively. Her clinical areas of expertise include college counseling, school-based mental health counseling with adolescents, and grief and loss counseling. Her research and professional areas of interest include multicultural counseling and counselor education, LGBTQ+ issues in counseling, grief and loss, and identity development.

Carla Roberson, M.A., is a doctoral student in the Counselor Education program at Ohio University. She earned her Master’s in Mental Health and School Counseling from New Jersey City University and has served as a school counselor and assistant director at a non-profit organization in the Jersey City community. She has also taught as an adjunct professor in Pillar College's Master of Arts in Counseling Program.

Brandon Tramble, B.A., CT is a Master's student in the counselor education program at Ohio University. He holds a Bachelor's degree from Ohio University and is completing his counseling internship experience. His professional interests include multicultural counseling, diversity in higher education, and identity development.

Start Date

2-9-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

2-9-2018 12:00 PM

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Feb 9th, 10:45 AM Feb 9th, 12:00 PM

Processing the process: A multicultural self-awareness group in multicultural counselor training

With many strategies designed to foster multicultural counseling awareness, this session addresses the utility of a process group in a multicultural counseling course, including the group’s purpose, structure, and procedures. The presenters will share experiences of facilitating the group, describe benefits of “processing the process,” present critical incidents identified by students, and discuss strategies for implementation.