Title

Labels: The Good, the Bad, & the Ugly.

Conference Strand

Identity Formation

Abstract

Freak. Slut. Thug. All of these are words that are used as labels placed on people that describes what or who they are. Labels can be limiting to a person’s well-being and growth. In this session you will learn about what labels are and how they affect a person’s well-being and mental health. This session will give you some appropriate skills and techniques to use in order to erase a label put on you or someone you know. You will understand how to rewrite a newer label for yourself and rise above negative, false preconceived beliefs. This session will allow you to gain a sense of autonomy, self growth, and personal development.

Description

Socially constructed, labels are placed on individuals without their consent. Labels are typically used to place judgement about the characteristics of an individual or groups of persons. Labels are associated with stigma and stereotypes (Link & Phelan, 2001). These false perceptions can be internalized by individuals and affect their mental health and well-being.

With the use of the ecological model, attendees will understand how labels affect an individual in their micro, meso/exo, and macrosystem levels. First example, a young Black girl being labeled as “angry”. In her microsystem, she is labeled by peers at school. This label is then reinforced in the meso/exosystem through the media that portrays Black, female reality tv stars participating in arguments. The label can further be reinforced within the macrosystem based on the stereotype of the angry Black woman. Second example, A young male with a disability being labeled as “crippled”. In his microsystem, he is labeled by peers at work when he overhears them whisper and point at him. This label is then reinforced in his meso/exosystem when he overhears his neighbors children asking, “What’s wrong with that man? Why is he in a wheelchair?”. This label is further reinforced through his macrosystem with the notion of people with disabilities are weak.

This session depicts how labels affect everyone in some form. Labels are not exempted from being place on anyone. Labels can be used to describe a person’s physical or mental ability, sexual orientation, race, socioeconomic status, etc. Labels are a common denominator in which everyone in some way are consistently experiencing. Whether positive or negative, labels can and will be used to place some form of judgement and or societal discrimination to describe a person or group of people. This session will ultimately assist attendees to recognize and address the barriers in which labels impede on an individual. Attendees will be able to connect the information from the session back to their personal life and/or clinical experience as a mental health professional when addressing multiculturalism and diversity in regard to labels.

Evidence

Haller, B., Dorries B., & Rahn, J. (2006). Media labeling versus the US disability community identity: a study of shifting cultural language. Disability & Society, 21(1), 61-75. doi: 10.1080/09687590500375416

Link, B., Phalen, J.C., (2001). Conceptualizing stigma. Annual Review of Sociology, (27), 363-385.

Pyke, K., Dang, T. (2003). “FOB” and “Whitewashed”: Identity and internalized racism among second generation asian americans. Qualitative Sociology, 26(2), 147-172. doi: 10.1023/A:1022957011866

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Warren B. Wright is a graduate student at Georgia Southern University, pursuing a M.Ed. in Counselor Education, Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Warren is completing his internship experience at SCAD’s Counseling & Student Support Services in Savannah, GA. In the future, Warren hopes to gain experience as a counselor on a college campus before pursuing a PhD program in Counselor Education and Supervision.

Pamela C. Wells is an assistant professor at Georgia Southern University and the clinical mental health counseling concentration coordinator. Her research interests include mindfulness and counselor education, spirituality, and creativity in the classroom. Prior to joining academia, Pam worked in university student affairs.

Start Date

2-9-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

2-9-2018 2:15 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 9th, 1:00 PM Feb 9th, 2:15 PM

Labels: The Good, the Bad, & the Ugly.

Freak. Slut. Thug. All of these are words that are used as labels placed on people that describes what or who they are. Labels can be limiting to a person’s well-being and growth. In this session you will learn about what labels are and how they affect a person’s well-being and mental health. This session will give you some appropriate skills and techniques to use in order to erase a label put on you or someone you know. You will understand how to rewrite a newer label for yourself and rise above negative, false preconceived beliefs. This session will allow you to gain a sense of autonomy, self growth, and personal development.