Title

"Get Out" Survival guide: Transcending from your sunken place

Conference Strand

Practice, Strategies, Techniques, and Interventions

Abstract

With the use of media such as the movie released on February 24, 2017 entitled “Get Out” by Jordan Peel, the presenters have developed a method to utilize media to understand racism and its implications. The participants will be able to identify emotional, physical, psychosocial and spiritual implications of racism via critical analysis of the movie “Get Out”. Specifically, the presenters will focus on creating an atmosphere of awareness, knowledge, and skill of elevating your consciousness to transcend racism in its various forms.

Description

- Participants will be able to define his or her relative sunken place

-Participants will be able to recognize his or her vulnerabilities and acquire skills to eliminate the impact of racism

-Participants will be able to establish ways to transcendence there sunken place

Evidence

According to Sue et al. (2007) micro-aggressions are “brief and common place daily, verbal, behavioral, and environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults to the target person or group”p.273.

More specifically, there are three (3) types of microaggressions that cause immediately harm to those affected. They are:

1-microassaults, which are the “intentional verbal or nonverbal attacks”.

2-microinsults, which are “unintentional rude and insensitive verbal and nonverbal communications that demean someone’s racial heritage or identity”.

3-microinvalidations, which are verbal and nonverbal communications that serve to “exclude, negate, or nullify the psychological thoughts, feelings, or experiential reality of a person of color” (Sue et al., 2007)

There are numerous research studies which highlight the fact that many individuals experience microaggressions on a daily basis. Smith, Mustaffa, Jones, Curry, and Allen (2016) conducted focus groups to examine the experiences of 36 Black male students attending seven White Institutions. The participants expressed feelings of marginality and hypersurveillance by individuals who are White. Kaufman, Baams, and Dubas (2017) examined the consequences of microaggressions against sexual minority youth. Their findings further confirm the need for an awareness of the negative impact of microaggressions, as their study, among 267 Dutch sexual minority youth revealed, via data analysis of an online survey, that even the most subtle and unintentional microaggressions could be related to sexual minority youth’s psychological maladjustment. Conover, Israel, and Nylund-Gibson (2017) developed a scale for the purpose of measuring microagrressions experienced by individuals with physical disabilities, called the Ableist Microaggressions Scale. The purpose of developing this scale was to fill in a gap in the literature for actually assessing disability microaggressions. Similarly, this presentation seeks to add to an ongoing dialogue surrounding the effects of microaggressions in hopes of combatting the issue with more of a solution than just to “Get Out” of the circumstances in which the microaggressions may be occurring.

Conover, K.J., Israel, T., Nylund-Gibson, K. (2017). Development and validation of the Ableist

Microaggressions Scale. The Counseling Psychologist 45(4), 570-599.

Kaufman, T.M.L., Baams, L., & Dubas, J.S. (2017). Microaggressions and depressive symptoms

in sexual minority youth: The roles of rumination and social support. Psychology of

Sexual Orientation And Gender Diversity 4(2), 184-192.

Sue, D. W., Capodilupo, C. M., Torino, G. C., Bucceri, J. M., Holder, A. M. B., Nadal, K. L., &

Esquilin, M. (2007). Racial microaggressions in everyday life: Implications for clinical

practice. American Psychologist, 62(4), 271-286. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.62.4.271

Smith, W.A., Mustaffa, J.B., Jones, C.M., Curry, T.J., & Allen, W.R. (2016). ‘You make me wanna

holler and throw up both my hands!’: Campus culture, Black misandric microaggressions,

and racial battle fatigue. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education 29(9), 1189-

1209.

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Rebecca George, LPC, NCC, ACS

Clinical Coordinator – Columbia rgeorgebrown99@webster.edu

EDUCATION

PhD, University of South Carolina, 2007

M.S, SC State University, 2000

BA, Benedict College, 1998

BIOGRAPHY

Rebecca George joined Webster University as an Adjunct Counseling Faculty for the Columbia Metropolitan Campus in 2007. She became a Core Full time Faculty in 2015. Rebecca earned a Master of Science Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling from the SC State University in 2000 and earned her PhD in Counselor Education from the University of South Carolina in 2007. Rebecca is a Nationally Certified Counselor, a Licensed Professional Counselor, as well as an Approved Clinical Supervisor Counselor. She has also worked as the Director of Family Life Intervention Program at Carolina Children’s Home and taught Special Education in Columbia, South Carolina.

Dr. Alexanderia T. Smith, LPC, CAC

Director, South Carolina Counseling Program Instructor, Columbia Metro Department of Professional Counseling asmithglenn62@webster.edu (803) 699-0900

EDUCATION

PhD, University of South Carolina, 2007

M.Ed, University of Georgia, 2001

BA, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 1999

BIOGRAPHY

Alexanderia Smith joined Webster University as the Counseling Program Coordinator for the Columbia Metropolitan Campus in 2009. She became the State Director for the Counseling Programs in South Carolina in 2013. Alexanderia earned a Master of Education Degree in Counseling from the University of Georgia in 2001 and earned her Ph.D. in Counselor Education from the University of South Carolina in 2007. Alexanderia is a Nationally Certified Counselor, a Licensed Professional Counselor, as well as a Certified Addictions Counselor. She has also worked as the Director of Crisis Services at Sexual Trauma Services of the Midlands in Columbia, South Carolina.

Start Date

2-9-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

2-9-2018 5:15 PM

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Feb 9th, 4:00 PM Feb 9th, 5:15 PM

"Get Out" Survival guide: Transcending from your sunken place

With the use of media such as the movie released on February 24, 2017 entitled “Get Out” by Jordan Peel, the presenters have developed a method to utilize media to understand racism and its implications. The participants will be able to identify emotional, physical, psychosocial and spiritual implications of racism via critical analysis of the movie “Get Out”. Specifically, the presenters will focus on creating an atmosphere of awareness, knowledge, and skill of elevating your consciousness to transcend racism in its various forms.