Title

Addressing minority myths and race-based biases from a counseling perspective

Conference Strand

Practice, Strategies, Techniques, and Interventions

Abstract

The conference strand addressed by this session is Practice, Strategies, Techniques, and Interventions. This session highlights strategies for recognizing and addressing minority myths and race-based biases among professional counselors across a variety of settings. In addition to addressing negative beliefs about people of various cultures, the presentation also addresses the responsibilities and expectations of counselors.

Description

Many factors affect the quality of care provided by mental health professionals. Professional judgment is compromised by personal beliefs and biases that counselors hold about other people from differing cultural backgrounds. This presentation addresses the impact of minority myths and race-based biases on counselors’ ability to make ethical decisions. This presentation will highlight notable, long-standing American viewpoints of Asian, African, and African American people. Participants will increase their knowledge about specific race-based biases. Participants will increase their knowledge about minority myths. Participants will increase their understanding of ethical considerations related to personal biases of differing cultures. The conference strand addressed by this session is Practice, Strategies, Techniques, and Interventions. This session highlights strategies for recognizing and addressing minority myths and race-based biases among professional counselors across a variety of settings. In addition to addressing negative beliefs about people of various cultures, the presentation also addresses the responsibilities and expectations of counselors.

Evidence

Bothwell, R.K., Brigham, J.C., & Malpass, R.S. (1989). Cross-racial identification.

Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 15(1), 19-25.

Forester-Miller, H. & Davis, T. (1996). A Practitioner's Guide to Ethical Decision

Making. American Counseling Association.

Museus, S. D. (2008). The model minority and the inferior minority myths:

Understanding stereotypes and their implications for student involvement. About

Campus, 13(3), 2-8.

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Latonya M. Graham is a National Certified Counselor and Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor. She is a Counselor Education doctoral candidate and the 2016-2017 Wilkinson Graduate Ethics Fellow at North Carolina State University. Latonya has over a decade of counseling experience serving children and adults, as well as couples and families, in a various public and private settings. Her research interests include ethics, aging population, and racial disparities in mental health.

Start Date

2-9-2018 2:30 PM

End Date

2-9-2018 3:45 PM

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Feb 9th, 2:30 PM Feb 9th, 3:45 PM

Addressing minority myths and race-based biases from a counseling perspective

The conference strand addressed by this session is Practice, Strategies, Techniques, and Interventions. This session highlights strategies for recognizing and addressing minority myths and race-based biases among professional counselors across a variety of settings. In addition to addressing negative beliefs about people of various cultures, the presentation also addresses the responsibilities and expectations of counselors.