Title

When External Factors meet Internal Realities: Combating Depression in African-American Males.

Conference Strand

Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy

Abstract

Current research shows that African-American men, while having slightly lower prevalence than their white counterparts, experience debilitating and persistent depressive episodes that are more resistant to treatment. However, common themes such as perceptions of depression, assessment and treatment of depression, social stressors and discrimination continue to be a barrier to receiving the treatment so desperately needed.

Description

This topic highlights the conference theme of Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy by encouraging counselors-in-training, professionals, and non-professionals to recognize the signs and symptoms of Depression in African-American Males. Objectives include: (1) Developing an understanding on how the perceptions of Depression by African-American males perpetuates under-utilization of services, (2) Identify strategies to assess and treat depression, and (3) Identify the -Isms that effect the socialization of African-American men. In applying these learned objectives to practice, professionals can advocate for the identified population by hosting community forums and sharing information with other professionals, community leaders, and future clients.

Evidence

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-5. Washington, D.C: American Psychiatric Association.

Baker, F. M. (2001). Diagnosing depression in african americans. Community Mental Health Journal, 37(1), 31-8. Retrieved from https://login.libproxy.edmc.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/228297679?accountid=34899

Banks, K.H., Kohn-Wood, L.P., & Spencer, M. (2006). An examination of the African American experience of everyday discrimination and symptoms of psychological distress. Community Mental Health Journal, 42(6), 555-70. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10597-006-9052-9

Boyd-Franklin, N. (2003). Black families in therapy: Understanding the African American experience. (2nd ed). New York, NY: The Guilford Press. (p.92-94).

Bryant, K., Haynes, T., Greer-Williams, N., & Hartwig, M. S. (2014). "Too blessed to be stressed": A rural faith community's views of African American males and depression. Journal of Religion and Health, 53(3), 796-808. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10943-012-9672-z

Cochran, S. V., & Rabinowitz, F. E. (2003). Gender-sensitive recommendations for assessment and treatment of depression in men. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 34(2), 132-140. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0735-7028.34.2.132

Green, K.M., Fothergill, K.E., Robertson, J.A., Zebrak, K. A., Banda, D.R., & Ensminger, M.E. (2013). Early life predictors of adult depression in a community cohort of urban African Americans. Journal of Urban Health, 90(1), 101-15. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11524-012-9707-5

Hammond, W. P. (2012). Taking it like a man: Masculine role norms as moderators of the racial discrimination-depressive symptoms association among African American men. American Journal of Public Health, 102, S232-S241. Retrieved from https://login.libproxy.edmc.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1017604808?accountid=34899

Hankerson, S. Suite, D. & Bailey, R. (2015). Treatment disparities among African American men with depression: Implications for clinical practice. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 26(1), 21-34. Retrieved from https://login.libproxy.edmc.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1661779457?accountid=34899

Oppong, S. (2014). Between bandura and giddens: Structuration theory in social psychological research? Psychological Thought, 7(2), 111-123. Retrieved from https://login.libproxy.edmc.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1619893391?accountid=34899

Sue, D.W., Capodilupo, C.M., Torino, G.C., Bucceri, J.M., Holder, A.M.B., Nadal, K.L., & Esquilin, M. (2007). Racial microaggressions in everyday life: Implications for clinical practice. American Psychologist, 62(4), 271-286. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.62.4.271

Schwing, A.E., Wong, Y.J., & Fann, M. D. (2013). Development and validation of the African American men's gendered racism stress inventory. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 14(1), 16-24. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0028272

Ward, E., & Mengesha, M. (2013). Depression in African American men: A review of what we know and where we need to go from here. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 83(2-3), 386-397. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajop.12015

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Ashley Smith is a Licensed Professional Counselor and a Nationally Certified Counselor. Ashley obtained a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Valdosta State University, a Master of Arts in Community Counseling from Argosy University, and currently working on an Ed. D of Counselor Education and Supervision. Ashley has experience working with individuals, groups, and families. Ashley has received training and experience in the areas of anger management, grief, severe and persistent mental disorders, sexual abuse/trauma, suicide/risk assessments, crisis, treatment planning, substance abuse, career counseling, behavior modification and clinical supervision. Ashley is compassionate about the field an educating the community about mental illness to decrease stigma and promote mental wellness.

Dr. Asha Dickerson is a Counselor Educator at Argosy University Atlanta. She is a Nationally Certified, Licensed Professional Counselor, and Certified Professional Counselor Supervisor. Dr. Dickerson is a native of Montgomery, Alabama and alumni of the University of Alabama at Birmingham having graduated with bachelor’s degrees in Psychology and History and a Master’s Degree in Community/Agency Counseling. She received a doctoral degree in Counselor Education and Supervision at Auburn University. Her professional background is in clinical mental health, substance addiction and family counseling. In addition to specializing in these areas, she is greatly involved with the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development at the state and national level in leadership positions and through presentations. Her professional experience includes work with child protective service agencies, Alabama school systems, and as Program Coordinator for an agency serving those with co-occurring diagnoses

Start Date

2-9-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

2-9-2018 5:15 PM

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Feb 9th, 4:00 PM Feb 9th, 5:15 PM

When External Factors meet Internal Realities: Combating Depression in African-American Males.

Current research shows that African-American men, while having slightly lower prevalence than their white counterparts, experience debilitating and persistent depressive episodes that are more resistant to treatment. However, common themes such as perceptions of depression, assessment and treatment of depression, social stressors and discrimination continue to be a barrier to receiving the treatment so desperately needed.