Title

Cross-Cultural Mentoring and Advocacy for African-American Female Counselor Educators Seeking Promotion

Conference Strand

Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy

Abstract

African-American female counselor educators face multicultural barriers in the promotion process. Cross-cultural mentoring bridges the gap between privileged faculty gatekeepers and minority female counselor educators seeking promotion. This presentation examines barriers to the promotion of African-American female counselor educators and examines leadership, advocacy, and social change strategies that promote successful cross-cultural mentoring to diversify counselor education faculty.

Description

The American Counseling Association (2014) and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP, 2016) have guidelines for the recruiting and retention of diverse counselor education faculty. However, African-American female counselor educators are underrepresented at CACREP-accredited programs, and they occupy lower or junior level faculty positions in comparison to African-American men (Bradley & Holcomb-McCoy, 2004; Hall, 2010). Mentorship is successful for the professional development of African Americans in academia (Alexander, 2010; Brooks & Steen, 2010; Frazier, 2011; Haizlip, 2012). However, due to the limited number of African-American senior faculty in counselor education programs, same culture mentoring for African-American female counselor educators is often not possible (Alexander, 2010; Frazier, 2011). White male and non-African American senior counselor education faculty have the power and privilege of gatekeeping which makes them appropriate mentor candidates (Behar-Horenstein, West-Olatunji, Moore, Houchen, & Roberts 2012; Frazier, 2011). Cross-cultural mentoring is necessary to breakdown negative cultural stereotypes and barriers that hinder the retention of a diverse faculty body (Behar-Horenstein et al., 2012; Bradley & Holcomb-McCoy, 2004). Previous cross-cultural mentoring experiences have had difficulties (Behar-Horenstein et al., 2012; Frazier, 2011; Holcomb-McCoy & Addison-Bradley, 2005) and institutions need formalized leadership, advocacy, and social change strategies that foster effective cross-cultural mentoring for African-American female counselor educators seeking promotion (Behar-Horenstein et al., 2012; Frazier, 2011). The goal of this interactive PowerPoint presentation is to examine barriers to the tenure and promotion process of African-American female counselor educators and examine leadership, advocacy, and social change strategies that promote successful cross-cultural mentoring of African-American female counselor to diversify tenured and senior-level counselor education faculty.

Evidence

Alexander, T. (2010). Roots of leadership: Analysis of the narratives from African American women leaders in higher education. International Journal of Learning, 17(4), 193-204.

American Counseling Association. (2014). 2014 ACA code of ethics. Retrieved from http://www.counseling.org/knowledge-center/ethics

Behar-Horenstein, L. S., West-Olatunji, C. A., Moore, T. E., Houchen, D. F., & Roberts, K. W. (2012). Resilience post tenure: The experience of an African American woman in a PWI. Florida Journal of Educational Administration & Policy, 5(2), 68-84. Retrieved from http://web.a.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=5&sid=4e0f1b99-e560-44c9-b65e-f204d37555f1%40sessionmgr4006&hid=4207

Bradley, C., & Holcomb-McCoy, C. (2004). African American counselor educators: Their experiences, challenges, and recommendations. Counselor Education and Supervision, 43(4), 258-273. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2004.tb01851.x

Brooks, M., & Steen, S. (2010). 'Brother, where art thou?' African American male instructors' perceptions of the counselor education profession. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 38(3), 142-153. doi:10.1002/j.2161-1912.2010.tb00122.x

Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs. (2016). 2016 CACREP standards. Retrieved from http://www.cacrep.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/2016-Standards-with-Glossary-rev-2.2016.pdf

Frazier, K. N. (2011). Academic bullying: A barrier to tenure and promotion for African-American faculty. Florida Journal of Educational Administration & Policy, 5(1), 1-13. Retrieved from http://web.a.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=13&sid=4e0f1b99-e560-44c9-b65e-f204d37555f1%40sessionmgr4006&hid=4207

Hall, M. M. (2010). An investigation of the experiences of African American female counselor educators who teach multicultural counseling courses in traditionally white institutions (Order No. 3413215). Available from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Full Text. (746123099). Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/746123099?accountid=14872

Haizlip, B. N. (2012). Addressing the underrepresentation of African Americans in counseling and psychology programs. College Student Journal, 46(1), 214-222.

Holcomb-McCoy, C., & Addison-Bradley, C. (2005). African American counselor educators' job satisfaction and perceptions of departmental racial climate. Counselor Education & Supervision, 45(1), 2-15.

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Ashley Keaton is a third year doctorate student in the counselor education and supervision program at Walden University. She is a Nationally Certified Counselor, as well as a Licensed Professional Counselor, in the state of Georgia. Ashley Keaton is the owner of ARA Professional Counseling Services, LLC serving children, adolescents, adults, and families. In addition to her counseling duties, Ashley is a clinical supervisor intern at Rainbow House, Inc. in Jonesboro, Georgia supervising counseling and social work interns working with child and adolescent sexual, physical abuse, and neglect.

Location

Room 212

Start Date

2-17-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

2-17-2017 2:15 PM

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Feb 17th, 1:00 PM Feb 17th, 2:15 PM

Cross-Cultural Mentoring and Advocacy for African-American Female Counselor Educators Seeking Promotion

Room 212

African-American female counselor educators face multicultural barriers in the promotion process. Cross-cultural mentoring bridges the gap between privileged faculty gatekeepers and minority female counselor educators seeking promotion. This presentation examines barriers to the promotion of African-American female counselor educators and examines leadership, advocacy, and social change strategies that promote successful cross-cultural mentoring to diversify counselor education faculty.