Title

Posttraumatic Growth and African American Clients: A Response to Race Related Trauma

Conference Strand

Research and Theory

Abstract

The application of Posttraumatic Growth for counselors working with African American clients experiencing race related trauma will be explored. Implications for clinical practice, research and advocacy will be provided.

Description

The question as to whether African Americans are held to a different standard in our society has been overtly posed by the media, celebrities and others alike as a result of the recent wave of seemingly senseless deaths of many young African American men. Action and change are two words that describe the collective voice of those who stand in solidarity for freedom and justice for all. Previous research has identified discrimination and institutional racism as factors that negatively affect health outcomes of marginalized groups, in particular African-Americans. Counselors, however, are uniquely positioned to offer services that assist African American clients trying to manage symptoms of race related trauma, an individual’s exposure to racism which causes emotional or psychological stress and physical harm or fear. Posttraumatic Growth (PTG), positive changes that occur as a result of the struggle with a major life crisis or traumatic event, is not a new phenomenon but is being studied more by traditions of clinical practice and scientific research. An alternative to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, PTG offers an individual the opportunity to use trauma experiences as a constructive modality for sustainable growth and change. Our presentation will define, describe and provide cultural context of race related trauma as well as examine how counseling professionals can implement PTG approaches when working with African American victims. In addition, recommendations for clinical practice, advocacy and future research will be provided.

Evidence

Bryant-Davis, T. (2007). Healing requires recognition: The case for race-based traumatic stress. The Counseling Psychologist, 35, 135-142.

Bryant-Davis, T., & Ocampo, C. (2005). Racist incident based trauma. The Counseling Psychologist. 33(4), 479-500.

Calhoun, L.G., & Tedeschi, R.G. (1998). Beyond recovery from trauma: Implications for clinical practice and research. Journal of Social Issues, 54(2), 357-371.

Tedeschi, R. G., & Calhoun, L. G. (2004). Posttraumatic growth: Conceptual foundations and empirical evidence. Psychological Inquiry, 15, 1–18.

Triplett, K. N., Tedeschi, R. G., Cann, A., Calhoun, L. G., & Reeve, C. L. (2012). Posttraumaticgrowth, meaning in life, and life satisfaction in response to trauma. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, And Policy, 4(4), 400-410.

Sue, D & Sue, D., (2013). Counseling the Culturally Diverse: Theory and Practice (6th Ed.). NY: J. Wiley.

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Lisa Littlejohn Hill, MA, NCC,LPCA

Lisa Littlejohn Hill is a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where she also received her Masters in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. She has worked as a Mental Health Education Specialist for Carolinas Healthcare System and has been in private practice for the last 4 years. Her research interests include Posttraumatic Growth, trauma and spirituality in counseling.

Allura Pulliam, M.Ed., M.S.

Allura Pulliam is a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She hold a Masters in Education and a Master of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. She is a licensed school counselor (TN) and her research interests include community trauma, racial battle fatigue, advocacy and multicultural competencies.

Location

Room 210

Start Date

2-17-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

2-17-2017 2:15 PM

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Feb 17th, 1:00 PM Feb 17th, 2:15 PM

Posttraumatic Growth and African American Clients: A Response to Race Related Trauma

Room 210

The application of Posttraumatic Growth for counselors working with African American clients experiencing race related trauma will be explored. Implications for clinical practice, research and advocacy will be provided.