Title

Minority Faculty Retention in Counselor Education: Where Are We Now?

Conference Strand

Teaching, Training, and Supervision

Abstract

Counseling is diversifying in all aspects including the clients and the student body. There have also been calls to diversity counseling faculty and there has been some success. However, research regarding retention of minority faculty is still growing. This session will give an overview of the unique stressors of minority faculty and suggestions for successful retention programming.

Description

The field of counseling is becoming more diverse and counselor education is doing its best to keep up. Governing bodies for counseling and counselor education have encouraged that counselor education programs look for ways to diversify their faculty to reflect the country’s multicultural population (CACREP Standards, 2016; Dinsmore & England, 1996). To this end, researchers have suggested counseling programs increase attention to minority hiring practices through focused diversity hiring initiatives, such as directly contacting possible applicants, modifying searches, and networking with colleagues about minority doctoral students (Holcomb-McCoy & Bradley, 2003).

However, after being hired, minority faculty still report unique job stressors including challenges with students, feelings of alienation, and lack of support (Shillingford, Trice-Black, & Butler, 2013). Bradley and Holcomb-McCoy (2004) suggested mentoring, a reduction in racial tension, and inclusiveness as suggestions to retain minority faculty. While these suggestions are strong, the research is in need of an update. This session will report on a study that investigated the experiences of minority faculty and administration and the steps taken to retain faculty in counselor education programs. Attendants of this session will learn:

  1. Unique hurdles minority faculty face in seeking tenure.
  2. Minority faculty requests for retention programming.
  3. Initiatives and suggestions for retention as presented by university administrators.

Evidence

Bradley, C., & Holcomb-McCoy, C. (2004). African American counselor educators: Their experiences, challenges, and recommendations. Counselor Education and Supervision, 43(4), 258.

Dinsmore, J. A., & England, J. T. (1996). A Study of Multicultural Counseling Training at CACREP‐Accredited Counselor Education Programs. Counselor Education and Supervision, 36(1), 58-76.

Holcomb-McCoy, C., & Bradley, C. (2003). Recruitment and retention of ethnic minority counselor educators: An exploratory study of CACREP-accredited counseling programs. Counselor Education and Supervision,42(3), 231.

Shillingford, M., Trice‐Black, S., & Butler, S. K. (2013). Wellness of minority female counselor educators. Counselor Education and Supervision, 52(4), 255-269.

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Kristopher G. Hall, PhD and Asha Dickerson, PhD, NCC are minority faculty counselor educators in the tenure seeking process. They have both worked with AMCD in various capacities over the last four years. Their work focuses on the experiences of minorities in counseling including counselor education and counseling practice.

Location

Room 212

Start Date

2-18-2017 12:45 PM

End Date

2-18-2017 2:00 PM

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Feb 18th, 12:45 PM Feb 18th, 2:00 PM

Minority Faculty Retention in Counselor Education: Where Are We Now?

Room 212

Counseling is diversifying in all aspects including the clients and the student body. There have also been calls to diversity counseling faculty and there has been some success. However, research regarding retention of minority faculty is still growing. This session will give an overview of the unique stressors of minority faculty and suggestions for successful retention programming.