Title

Ethnic Racial Identity Models

Conference Strand

Ethical Issues in Professional Counseling

Abstract

Nigrescence Theory and Phinney Model

This workshop will contrast and compare the stages of Nigrescence Theory and the stages of the Ethnic-Racial Identity Development Theory proposed by Jean Phinney. These model dominate the discourse on racial-ethnic identity development. Each model will be applied to the Black Lives matters social movement to determine which offers the best fit

Description

The Phinney Model of Racial-ethnic Identity development dominates the discourse on racial-ethnic identity development. However, it falls short in being able to explicate the identity dynamics of youth who participate in the black lives matters social movement. Nigrescence Theory better explicates social movement participation. In this workshop we will deconstruct both approaches to determine which model better predicts identity praxis – that is the translation of identity into social action.

Evidence

References

Adams, M., & Bell, L. A. (2016). Teaching for diversity and social justice Routledge.

Banks, J. A. (2015). Cultural diversity and education Routledge.

Bjorklund, D. F., & Pellegrini, A. D. (2002). The origins of human nature: Evolutionary developmental psychology. American Psychological Association.

Cross, W. E., & Cross, T. B. (2008). Theory, research, and models. Handbook of Race, Racism, and the Developing Child, 154-181.

Erikson, E. H. (1959). Identity and the life cycle: Selected papers. Psychological Issues,

Gerlach, L. P., & Hine, V. H. (1970). People, power, change: Movements of social transformation. MacMillan Publishing Company.

Marinetto, M. (2003). Who wants to be an active citizen? the politics and practice of community involvement. Sociology, 37(1), 103-120.

Neville, H. and Cross, W. E. (in press). Racial Awakening: Epiphanies and Encounters in Black Racial Identity, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology.

Polletta, F., & Jasper, J. M. (2001). Collective identity and social movements. Annual Review of Sociology, 283-305.

Rabaka, R. (2010). Forms of Fanonism: Frantz fanon's critical theory and the dialectics of decolonization. Lexington Books.

Spencer, M. B., Dupree, D., & Hartmann, T. (1997). A phenomenological variant of ecological systems theory (PVEST): A self-organization perspective in context. Development and Psychopathology, 9(04), 817-833.

Swanson, D. P., Cunningham, M., & Spencer, M. B. (2003). Black males' structural conditions, achievement patterns, normative needs, and “opportunities”. Urban Education, 38(5), 608-633.

Tarrow, S. G., & Tollefson, J. (1994). Power in movement: Social movements, collective action and politics. Cambridge.

Toch, H. (2013). The social psychology of social movements (psychology revivals). Routledge.

Watts, R. J., & Flanagan, C. (2007). Pushing the envelope on youth civic engagement: A

developmental and liberation psychology perspective. Journal of community psychology, 35(6), 779-792.

Wijeyesinghe, C. L., & Jackson III, B. W. (2001). New perspectives on racial identity development: A theoretical and practical anthology. New York University Press.

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Professor Cross is leading theorist on black identity

Location

Room 217

Start Date

2-18-2017 8:30 AM

End Date

2-18-2017 9:45 AM

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Feb 18th, 8:30 AM Feb 18th, 9:45 AM

Ethnic Racial Identity Models

Room 217

Nigrescence Theory and Phinney Model

This workshop will contrast and compare the stages of Nigrescence Theory and the stages of the Ethnic-Racial Identity Development Theory proposed by Jean Phinney. These model dominate the discourse on racial-ethnic identity development. Each model will be applied to the Black Lives matters social movement to determine which offers the best fit