Title

The Use of Sister Circles to Avert Trauma for Black Women in the Academy

Conference Strand

Practice, Strategies, Techniques, and Interventions

Abstract

Trauma for Black Women has been well documented in the literature. From the early and continuing work of Robert T. Carter and colleagues (2007, 2010 and 2011), on the examination of Race-Based Trauma (RBT) at the individual, cultural, and institutional levels to more recent scholarship addressing the specifics for women of color (Davis, Vakalahi & Scales, 2015), the damaging impact of racism has been chronicled. The cumulative effect of micro and macro inequities have rendered Black women physically and mentally ill. The personal costs of such injury have been paid at the relationship, financial and physical levels for the very limited number of those even breaking through the walls to enter the academy.

While Sister Circles are not new, more data is available to study their relevance as an intervention for race trauma. A general description is provided in an article published in Clinical Psychology (2011): “Sister circles are support groups that build upon existing friendships, fictive kin networks, and the sense of community found among African American females.” Such circles have been formed inside and outside of higher education, including groups (like the Save our Sisters Project) that are culturally relevant in taking on the stress and anxiety that are outcomes of racism.

Description

Colleagues who have both been engaged in research and analysis relative to Race-Based Trauma, and who have participated in Sister Circles will discuss the data behind trauma and self-care, and the relevance of Sister Circles as an intervention to address, in particular, the isolation and anxiety experienced by Black women in the academy. The session will be interactive.

Evidence

Barnett, Angela, et.al, September2011. “Sister Circles as a Culturally Relevant Intervention for Anxious African American Women.” Clinical Psychology 18(3): 266-273.

Carter, Robert T. 2007. “Racism and Psychological and Emotional Injury: Recognizing and Assessing Race- Based Traumatic Stress.” The Counseling Psychologist 35(1):13-105.

Carter, Robert T. and John S. Forsyth, 2010. “Reactions to Racial Discrimination: Emotional Stress and Help-seeking Behaviors.” Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy 2(3): 183-191.

Format

Panel Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Renay Scales, Ph.D., Director of Faculty Development/Associate Professor of Family Med

Lisa Scott, M.Ed., Vice President for Student Engagement, Susquehanna University

Kim Kirkland, Ed.D., Director of Equal Opportunity, Indiana University-Purdue University

Indianapolis

Location

Room 210

Start Date

2-18-2017 8:30 AM

End Date

2-18-2017 9:45 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 18th, 8:30 AM Feb 18th, 9:45 AM

The Use of Sister Circles to Avert Trauma for Black Women in the Academy

Room 210

Trauma for Black Women has been well documented in the literature. From the early and continuing work of Robert T. Carter and colleagues (2007, 2010 and 2011), on the examination of Race-Based Trauma (RBT) at the individual, cultural, and institutional levels to more recent scholarship addressing the specifics for women of color (Davis, Vakalahi & Scales, 2015), the damaging impact of racism has been chronicled. The cumulative effect of micro and macro inequities have rendered Black women physically and mentally ill. The personal costs of such injury have been paid at the relationship, financial and physical levels for the very limited number of those even breaking through the walls to enter the academy.

While Sister Circles are not new, more data is available to study their relevance as an intervention for race trauma. A general description is provided in an article published in Clinical Psychology (2011): “Sister circles are support groups that build upon existing friendships, fictive kin networks, and the sense of community found among African American females.” Such circles have been formed inside and outside of higher education, including groups (like the Save our Sisters Project) that are culturally relevant in taking on the stress and anxiety that are outcomes of racism.