Proposal Title

Perceptions of Barriers to Online Teaching: Does Online Training Help

Track

Research Proposal / Online Learning

Proposal Abstract

Online learning is becoming a more highly desired method for instruction in the educational setting by both students and faculty. With this shift, an evolution of faculty teaching practices must occur to better address the uniqueness of learners in the online environment (Lloyd, Byrne, & McCoy, 2012). But, are faculty ready to make the necessary adjustments to their teaching to meet this new reality? This study explores faculty’s perceived barriers to online teaching and learning and assesses whether participation in an online training program influences these perceptions.

Proposal Description

Problem

Online learning is increasing throughout higher education, however negative perceptions are commonly reported in the literature (Lloyd, Byrne, & McCoy, 2012). Further, research focused on the perspective of the learner and their perceptions of online learning is limited in comparison (Song, Singleton, Hill, & Koh, 2004). Our research addresses this by measuring learners’ individual differences, specifically perceived barriers to online training, and using these individual differences to predict participation and performance in an online training course.

Method

We measured individual differences on the main independent variable by administering Lloyd’s (2012) measure of perceived barriers of online learning and training. The instruments were administered pre and post training.

The dependent variables of participation and performance were tracked via the learning management system (LMS) used, which yielded number of logins, number of training items accessed, and amount of time spent in the course.

Findings and Conclusion

Preliminary findings indicate that faculty housed in the business school and law school do not tend to perceive online learning as being undervalued, which is listed as a barrier to online learning, while faculty in the school of humanities and social sciences do perceive online training being undervalued as a barrier. This is interesting because classrooms in the business and law school are more highly integrated with technology and it is more readily available than for faculty in the school of Humanities and Social Sciences.

The present study takes steps toward understanding the faculty’s perceptions of barriers in online teaching and learning. Based on our preliminary results, we are able to learn more about the faculty’s perceived barriers and determine how they impact their participation in online training. Utilizing this information, and conducting additional research extending the findings reported here, will enable institutions to make improvements in their online training.

Session Format

Student Voices in SoTL Poster Session

Location

Room 3

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 30th, 10:00 AM Mar 30th, 10:45 AM

Perceptions of Barriers to Online Teaching: Does Online Training Help

Room 3

Online learning is becoming a more highly desired method for instruction in the educational setting by both students and faculty. With this shift, an evolution of faculty teaching practices must occur to better address the uniqueness of learners in the online environment (Lloyd, Byrne, & McCoy, 2012). But, are faculty ready to make the necessary adjustments to their teaching to meet this new reality? This study explores faculty’s perceived barriers to online teaching and learning and assesses whether participation in an online training program influences these perceptions.