Proposal Title

Student learning remains unchanged after replacing the traditional textbook with low-cost open education resources in Introductory Biology

Co-Authors

Dr. Jung Choi, Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Shana Kerr, Georgia Institute of Technology

Track

Research Proposal / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

Lab science Biological Principles is typically taught in a 200+ seat flipped lecture format. In Fall 2015, we replaced the required traditional textbook and its on-line homework system with an open source collection of instructor-created written content and instructor-curated interactives and videos and low-cost on-line homework. Homework questions are now instructor-written and delivered to students outside of class in Learning Catalytics. A comparison of final exam questions and in-class question delivery on the same questions between these two semesters indicates no decline in student learning. Here we report the results of a comparison of student learning gains using student learning metrics of comparable test questions, homework questions, and in-class activity questions. This session includes an audience interactive with the course materials using Learning Catalytics to model our approach. The open education resources built for this course are made freely available on the internet for adoption and adaption by other schools in the USG.

Proposal Description

Biological Principles (BIOL 1510) at Georgia Tech is required course for many science and engineering majors and is typically taught in a 200+ seat flipped lecture format. Until this Fall 2015, students were required to purchase a textbook and subscription to an on-line homework system, Mastering Biology. In Fall 2015, a team of three faculty replaced the textbook with an open source collection of instructor-created written content and instructor-curated video materials. We also replaced the on-line homework system with instructor-written questions delivered to students outside of class in Learning Catalytics. In-class activities remained the same, where students submitted Learning Catalytics responses while working with informal student groups in class. Here we report the results of a comparison of student learning gains between Fall 2015 and Fall 2014, with a traditional textbook, using student learning metrics of comparable test questions, homework questions, and in-class activity questions, as well as student perceptions of their learning from participant surveys.

This scholarship provides:

  1. Evidence that the replacement of a traditional textbook with no-cost open education materials did not disrupt student learning gains.
  2. Linkages between instructor desired learning outcomes with student learning gains.
  3. The ability to use student-derived evidence to revise course learning objectives and course materials in real time.

The session will include an audience interactive with the course materials and the learning catalytics approach. Because the open education materials built for this course are made freely available on the internet, we hope that other schools in the USG will consider adopting and adapting our materials to suit their students learning needs.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 4

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 30th, 3:00 PM Mar 30th, 3:45 PM

Student learning remains unchanged after replacing the traditional textbook with low-cost open education resources in Introductory Biology

Room 4

Lab science Biological Principles is typically taught in a 200+ seat flipped lecture format. In Fall 2015, we replaced the required traditional textbook and its on-line homework system with an open source collection of instructor-created written content and instructor-curated interactives and videos and low-cost on-line homework. Homework questions are now instructor-written and delivered to students outside of class in Learning Catalytics. A comparison of final exam questions and in-class question delivery on the same questions between these two semesters indicates no decline in student learning. Here we report the results of a comparison of student learning gains using student learning metrics of comparable test questions, homework questions, and in-class activity questions. This session includes an audience interactive with the course materials using Learning Catalytics to model our approach. The open education resources built for this course are made freely available on the internet for adoption and adaption by other schools in the USG.