Track

Research Proposal / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

Success in college requires the development of self-regulated learning strategies that move beyond high school skills, but teaching these strategies can be challenging. In this presentation, participants will learn about an instructional method that requires students to practice self-regulated learning strategies--active reading, management of study time and achievement goals, proactive interaction with faculty, metacognitive reflection, and more—within the context of a student-selected course. The presenter will share data from two years of research on the assignment’s efficacy and engage participants in discussion about the potential applications of self-regulated learning in their own classrooms.

Proposal Description

To be successful in college, students must go beyond surface-level learning, taking ownership of learning by choosing and using the best resources and strategies for the task, as well as reflecting upon and monitoring their progress toward learning goals (Kitsantas, 2002), skills often grouped under the umbrella term “self-regulated learning” (e.g., Zimmerman, 2008). The research discussed in this presentation is grounded in the literature on self-regulation strategies and college success, and seeks to answer the question of whether self-regulation skills can be taught effectively through an assignment which requires deliberate practice of the strategies in an authentic context—a course in which the student is currently enrolled. In the Strategy Project assignment, students learn time management, communication, and study strategies in the process of preparing for an actual test, then demonstrate that learning by submitting their test preparation activities as part of a graded project in a first-year seminar course. By encouraging and providing feedback on reflective thinking and goal-directed interaction with faculty and peers, instructors can model the process of self-regulation. In the first year of the study (Steiner, 2016), qualitative data from the students’ completed projects were collected and analyzed for themes. Results indicated that the project did raise awareness of, and encourage the use of, these beneficial strategies, and for most students, also increased their test scores. In the second year of the study, which is in progress, a modified version of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire was administered at the beginning and end of the semester in which the Strategy Project was assigned in order to measure change in students’ self-reported strategic behavior. These findings will be discussed in the presentation. Finally, ample time in the presentation will be dedicated to helping participants brainstorm ways they can modify the project for their own use.

References

Kitsantas, A. (2002). Test preparation and test performance: A self-regulatory analysis. Journal of Experimental Education, 41, 231–240.

Steiner, H.H. (2016). The strategy project: Promoting self-regulated learning through an authentic assignment. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 28 (2), 271-282.

Zimmerman, B. J. (2008). Investigating self-regulation and motivation: Historical background, methodological developments, and future prospects. American Educational Research Journal, 45, 166–183.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 4

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 30th, 11:00 AM Mar 30th, 11:45 AM

Using a Strategy Project to Promote Self-Regulated Learning

Room 4

Success in college requires the development of self-regulated learning strategies that move beyond high school skills, but teaching these strategies can be challenging. In this presentation, participants will learn about an instructional method that requires students to practice self-regulated learning strategies--active reading, management of study time and achievement goals, proactive interaction with faculty, metacognitive reflection, and more—within the context of a student-selected course. The presenter will share data from two years of research on the assignment’s efficacy and engage participants in discussion about the potential applications of self-regulated learning in their own classrooms.