Proposal Title

The Impact of Reflective Practice on Teacher Education Students

Track

Research Proposal / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

We often think of reflective practice as “practicing what we teach”. In other words, we learn by doing or by experience. The use of reflective practice in the preparation of educators is a vital component of preservice training. However, the use of reflective practice not only enhances teaching and learning but also informs program design and implementation. Therefore, this session will focus both on the implications of research designed to address (1) What is the impact of the reflective practice as pedagogy in training preservice teachers; and (2) Is the research design easy to use and replicate?

Proposal Description

Reflective practice is a critical component of preservice teacher preparation. In addition to student teaching requirements, field placements are integrated into coursework. We often think of reflective practice as “practicing what we teach” or learning by doing. For the purpose of assessment, reflective practice refers to preservice students using reflective thinking after course content has been presented and students engage in a field-based learning experience. Despite the common use of reflective practice, most institutions do not conduct regular assessments to determine whether its impact. Therefore, the development of evaluative research that assesses student impact of reflective thinking is recommended.

In order to assess the impact of reflective practice on preservice teachers’ preparation, a study has been designed. The research will include the analysis of students’ reflective thinking assignments following 3 separate field-based experiences in 3 successive courses. Each student assignment makes use of a reflective model developed by Rolfe, Freshwater, & Jasper (2001). Written reflection experiences for approximately 200 students from a variety of teacher education preparation programs will be studied. The written assignments and accompanying scoring rubrics will be analyzed for student impact using Danielson’s (2007) Framework for Teaching, which provides a priori themes for data analysis, including: (1) planning and preparation, (2) classroom environment, (3) professional responsibilities, and (4) instruction. Data analysis includes within and across course comparisons as well as changes for individual students. The research methodology and design utilized will serve as a model for replication across teacher preparation programs.

By the time of the presentation, the study will be piloted, therefore, scholarly discussion of the process may enhance the implementation. Further, audience members will use the sticky-note storm activity to engage with the presenters regarding how the use of reflective practice on students’ learning can inform teacher education programming.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 5

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

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Mar 29th, 2:00 PM Mar 29th, 2:45 PM

The Impact of Reflective Practice on Teacher Education Students

Room 5

We often think of reflective practice as “practicing what we teach”. In other words, we learn by doing or by experience. The use of reflective practice in the preparation of educators is a vital component of preservice training. However, the use of reflective practice not only enhances teaching and learning but also informs program design and implementation. Therefore, this session will focus both on the implications of research designed to address (1) What is the impact of the reflective practice as pedagogy in training preservice teachers; and (2) Is the research design easy to use and replicate?