Proposal Title

Using Critical Reflection to Inform Social Justice Research and Pedagogy

Co-Authors

Dr. Alma Stevenson, Georgia Southern University

Track

Non-Research Proposal / About SoTL

Proposal Abstract

This presentation explores the significance of critical reflection for social justice research and social justice pedagogy through a discussion of the role of critical reflection in aligning social justice claims and social justice practice. Using Brookfield’s (1995) four lenses of critical reflection (i.e., autobiographical, students’ perspectives, colleagues’ perspectives, and theoretical literature) to operationalize connections between critical reflection and social justice, ways in which critical reflection on our practices resulted in curricular changes during implementation of a summer literacy program for African American youth as well as changes in one of our undergraduate pre-service education classes are highlighted.

Proposal Description

With its focus on improving social conditions, social justice education is closely aligned with Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) practices that emphasize connections between reflective, inquiry-oriented teaching, and social transformation (Gilpin & Liston, 2009). Social justice education and transformative SoTL practices share an emphasis on critical reflection – identification and interrogation of beliefs that influence thoughts and actions, and transformation of beliefs that are not supportive of one’s educational goals (Brookfield, 1995).

This presentation explores the significance of critical reflection for social justice research and social justice education by focusing on the role of critical reflection in ensuring alignment between social justice claims and social justice practice. Using Brookfield’s (1995) four lenses of critical reflection (i.e., autobiographical, students’ perspectives, colleagues’ perspectives, and theoretical literature) to operationalize connections between critical reflection and social justice, we highlight ways in which critical reflection on our practices resulted in curricular changes in two contexts: (a) during implementation of a four-week summer literacy program for African American youth; and (2) during the course of an undergraduate pre-service education class focusing on the education of linguistically and culturally diverse students.

This presentation contributes to transformative SoTL practices through theoretical grounding in processes of critical reflection and emphasis on the need for compatibility between social justice claims and social justice research and pedagogy. In this way, the presentation reflects the broad applicability of “third wave” SoTL scholarship (Gurung & Schwartz, 2010). Relatedly, by connecting local knowledge generated from the unique perspective of teacher researchers (Lytle & Cochran-Smith, 1992) to broader social justice aims, this presentation contributes to the diversity of literature that comprises the teaching commons other SoTL practitioners can draw upon in their own social justice work.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 3

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 31st, 11:00 AM Mar 31st, 11:45 AM

Using Critical Reflection to Inform Social Justice Research and Pedagogy

Room 3

This presentation explores the significance of critical reflection for social justice research and social justice pedagogy through a discussion of the role of critical reflection in aligning social justice claims and social justice practice. Using Brookfield’s (1995) four lenses of critical reflection (i.e., autobiographical, students’ perspectives, colleagues’ perspectives, and theoretical literature) to operationalize connections between critical reflection and social justice, ways in which critical reflection on our practices resulted in curricular changes during implementation of a summer literacy program for African American youth as well as changes in one of our undergraduate pre-service education classes are highlighted.