Co-Authors

Sara Greco, BSN, RN James Madison University

Erica Lewis, PhD, RN James Madison University

Julie Sanford, DNS, RN James Madison University

Allison Ames, PhD James Madison University

Track

Research Proposal / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

This SoTL study measured the effect of a disaster nursing simulation and debriefing session on nursing students’ perceived ethical reasoning confidence and beliefs in the importance of ethical reasoning. The simulation was placed within a community health undergraduate nursing course to teach disaster education, including triage/ prioritization, and ethical reasoning concepts. Using a quasi-experimental design, this study compared participants’ responses before and after the simulation using the Survey of Ethical Reasoning. Post-test results demonstrated an increase in students’ perceived ethical reasoning confidence, perceived importance of ethical reasoning, and utilization of our University’s Eight Key Questions Ethical Reasoning Framework.

Proposal Description

Healthcare workers often lack practical education and conceptual knowledge required for disaster response; there is little disaster education in programs of study. Because prioritization during a disaster is different from other clinical practice situations, disasters are fraught with ethical complexities. Simulation is a useful way to teach and prepare for disaster response.

To creatively incorporate disaster education and ethical reasoning concepts into a community health nursing undergraduate course, faculty, staff, and an undergraduate Honors student collaborated to design a disaster simulation. We used the simulation to learn more about students’ ethical reasoning development and confidence. This study measured the effect of a disaster nursing simulation and debriefing session on senior BSN students’ perceived ethical reasoning confidence and their beliefs in the importance of ethical reasoning. Using a quasi-experimental design, this study compared participants’ responses before and after the interventional activities using the Survey of Ethical Reasoning (SER).

The simulation consisted of a mimicked train derailment and resultant chemical spill. Students used the Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment (START) System for clinical prioritization. Student study participants completed the Survey of Ethical Reasoning (SER), a measure of the importance of and confidence in ability to ethically reason. During debriefing, the 8 Key Questions (8KQ), an evidence-based framework used by our University to guide ethical reasoning, were used to evaluate ethical challenges. We assessed nursing student perceptions of ethical reasoning pre/post disaster simulation and debriefing.

Project results will be presented, and a brief explanation of how the process works will be provided. Audience members will be invited to engage in discussion with the presenter to ask and discuss questions related to application of SoTL practice/ in the simulation laboratory setting, use of SoTL with health students, incorporation of university-wide initiatives into a SoTL research project, and student role in the disaster simulation development.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 5

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 29th, 3:00 PM Mar 29th, 3:45 PM

Ethical Reasoning Development through Disaster Simulation: SoTL in a Simulation Laboratory.

Room 5

This SoTL study measured the effect of a disaster nursing simulation and debriefing session on nursing students’ perceived ethical reasoning confidence and beliefs in the importance of ethical reasoning. The simulation was placed within a community health undergraduate nursing course to teach disaster education, including triage/ prioritization, and ethical reasoning concepts. Using a quasi-experimental design, this study compared participants’ responses before and after the simulation using the Survey of Ethical Reasoning. Post-test results demonstrated an increase in students’ perceived ethical reasoning confidence, perceived importance of ethical reasoning, and utilization of our University’s Eight Key Questions Ethical Reasoning Framework.