Proposal Title

Reflecting upon teaching diversity-centered courses: From novice to veteran

Track

Non-Research Proposal / About SoTL

Proposal Abstract

Studies have indicated that self-reflection has a positive effect on the academic growth of educators (Pedrosa-de-Jesus, Guerra, & Watts, 2016). Instructors that actively engage in self-reflection are more likely to exhibit an increased interest in the development of innovative teaching strategies, learning, and collaborative practices (Pedrosa-de-Jesus, Guerra, & Watts, 2016). This project highlights the experiences and self-reflection of two teachers of diversity-centered courses, at very different points in their careers: one a veteran Professor of more than 20 years and one an Assistant Professor of entering her third year. Implications for new and established professionals and the broader SoTL community are discussed.

Proposal Description

Recent changes in higher education have prompted increased attention in approaches to teaching and assessment of their effectiveness (Darling-Hammond & Youngs, 2002; Klassen & Tze, 2014). Studies have indicated that self-reflection has a positive effect on the academic growth of educators (Pedrosa-de-Jesus, Guerra, & Watts, 2016). Instructors that actively engage in self-reflection are more likely to exhibit an increased interest in the development of innovative teaching strategies, learning, and collaborative practices (Pedrosa-de-Jesus, Guerra, & Watts, 2016). Building upon these findings, self-reflection by teachers has the potential to further the integration of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning into universities. Self-reflection among educators that teach value-laden topics is of particular interest as course content inherently traverses sensitive material, such as diversity, prejudice, and discrimination. This project highlights the experiences and self-reflection of two teachers of diversity-centered courses, at very different points in their careers: one a veteran Professor of more than 20 years and one an Assistant Professor of entering her third year. Implications for new and established professionals and the broader SoTL community are discussed.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 3

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 30th, 11:00 AM Mar 30th, 11:45 AM

Reflecting upon teaching diversity-centered courses: From novice to veteran

Room 3

Studies have indicated that self-reflection has a positive effect on the academic growth of educators (Pedrosa-de-Jesus, Guerra, & Watts, 2016). Instructors that actively engage in self-reflection are more likely to exhibit an increased interest in the development of innovative teaching strategies, learning, and collaborative practices (Pedrosa-de-Jesus, Guerra, & Watts, 2016). This project highlights the experiences and self-reflection of two teachers of diversity-centered courses, at very different points in their careers: one a veteran Professor of more than 20 years and one an Assistant Professor of entering her third year. Implications for new and established professionals and the broader SoTL community are discussed.