Proposal Title

There is no, “I am stupid” anymore.

Track

Research Proposal / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

Researchers suggest that students who hold a growth mindset show improvement and growth over the students who hold a fixed mindset (Dweck, 2008; O’Rourke, Haimovitz, Ballweber, Dweck, & Popovi´c, 2014). This qualitative study included 25 pre-service teachers and their perceptions themselves as learners, future teachers, and their beliefs on student learning after learning about a growth mindset. The results of this study suggest that pre-service teachers, after learning about a growth mindset, changed their perceptions about themselves as learners, as future teachers, and their perception of how they will teach students.

Proposal Description

A growth mindset is the belief that intelligence can be changed over time (Dweck, 2010). Researchers suggest that students who hold a growth mindset show improvement and growth over the students who hold a fixed mindset, i.e., the belief that intelligence and skill level are set and therefore unchangeable (Dweck, 2008; O’Rourke, Haimovitz, Ballweber, Dweck, & Popovi´c, 2014). Therefore, we wanted to determine if informing preservice teachers about a growth mindset could improve their perceptions of themselves as a learner, as a future teacher, and the way they teach their students.

Qualitative research methodology was used in this study. Data collection included 25 participants who participated in four classroom activities that required the preservice teachers to reflect about how they perceive themselves as learners, future teachers, and their beliefs on student learning. Currently, this is little research about how teaching about a growth mindset changes pre-service teachers perceptions. The results of this study suggests that pre-service teachers, after learning about a growth mindset, changed their perceptions about themselves as learners, as future teachers, and their perception of how they will teach students. Implications for this study are that having a growth mindset will better prepare pre-service teachers to: (a) overcome obstacles in their own learning, (b) accept and overcome challenges that they experience professionally, and (c) work with future students. In addition, this study has implications for helping college students understand that they are in control of their own learning and that intelligence is not fixed. The objectives of the presentation are to use active learning strategies (e.g., think-pair-share and pass-the-paper) to share the results of the study, offer attendees recommendations for implementing teaching about a growth mindset, and participate in an activity wherein attendees can plan how they might implement aspects of the growth mindset into the college classroom.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 1

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 30th, 3:00 PM Mar 30th, 3:45 PM

There is no, “I am stupid” anymore.

Room 1

Researchers suggest that students who hold a growth mindset show improvement and growth over the students who hold a fixed mindset (Dweck, 2008; O’Rourke, Haimovitz, Ballweber, Dweck, & Popovi´c, 2014). This qualitative study included 25 pre-service teachers and their perceptions themselves as learners, future teachers, and their beliefs on student learning after learning about a growth mindset. The results of this study suggest that pre-service teachers, after learning about a growth mindset, changed their perceptions about themselves as learners, as future teachers, and their perception of how they will teach students.