Proposal Title

Preservice to Inservice: Comparing the Levels of Mathematics Anxiety Before/After Teaching Experience

Track

Research Proposal / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

Mathematics anxiety has an effect on learning, and may be a greater block to mathematics learning than supposed deficiencies in our school curricula and teacher preparation programs. This presentation highlights the longitudinal results regarding the determination/comparison of preservice mathematics anxiety before/after 5 years teaching experience. The results from the study provide insight into the durability and effectiveness of teacher training programs that emphasize manipulatives and other strategies to help reduce mathematics anxiety and supports the importance of having teacher education programs that influence the development of effective instructional practices while specifically addressing the reduction of mathematics anxiety in preservice teachers.

Proposal Description

Many preservice/inservice teachers continue avoidance of mathematics due to lack of confidence, ability, and mathematical content knowledge. The quality of mathematics instruction depends on the preparation of preservice teachers to teach mathematics. Attention is being directed toward the mathematics curriculum and in helping those who struggle learning basic mathematics skills, mastering more advance mathematics, and solving mathematics problems. Therefore, the purpose of this quantitative/qualitative research was to revisit former preservice teachers to determine if their mathematics anxiety still existed and/or exhibited any change after 5 inservice years and to determine, if any, the cause(s) of the affected change.

The results provide insight into the durability and effectiveness of teacher training programs that emphasize manipulatives and strategies to help reduce mathematics anxiety and supports the importance of having teacher education programs that influence the development of effective instructional practices while specifically addressing the reduction of mathematics anxiety.

Complete results show the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale preservice score slightly decreased but remained significantly high. Preservice/Inservice group means comparisons found that overall teachers’ mathematics anxiety (although still highly prevalent) decreased slightly after 5 years teaching experience. Qualitative results indicate mathematics anxiety was consistently evident within classrooms.

The results provide investigation for continued mathematics professional development opportunities that specifically address mathematics anxiety and to determine how teachers’ mathematics anxiety influences and affects instructional practices. Longitudinal studies is a critical component for institutions of higher education to make informed decisions about mathematics methods courses included in teacher education programs. Researchers and teachers must continue to work together to determine which curricula and instructional practices will bring the best results in mathematics achievement and thus eliminate the cycle of mathematics anxiety. Strategies will be illustrated for audience engagement. Time will be allowed for thoughts, comments, and relevance to the design, findings, and future recommendations for research.

Session Format

Panel Session

Location

Room 1

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

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Mar 29th, 9:00 AM Mar 29th, 9:45 AM

Preservice to Inservice: Comparing the Levels of Mathematics Anxiety Before/After Teaching Experience

Room 1

Mathematics anxiety has an effect on learning, and may be a greater block to mathematics learning than supposed deficiencies in our school curricula and teacher preparation programs. This presentation highlights the longitudinal results regarding the determination/comparison of preservice mathematics anxiety before/after 5 years teaching experience. The results from the study provide insight into the durability and effectiveness of teacher training programs that emphasize manipulatives and other strategies to help reduce mathematics anxiety and supports the importance of having teacher education programs that influence the development of effective instructional practices while specifically addressing the reduction of mathematics anxiety in preservice teachers.