Co-Authors

Dr. Beverly Wood, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - Worldwide

Track

Research Proposal / Teaching with Technology

Proposal Abstract

Numerous instructors have moved part of the instruction outside class meetings in order to provide more classtime for collaborative or supervised problem-solving and skill-building, often reporting dramatic improvement in the areas of retention, engagement, and achievement. The additional challenge faced by ERAU-Worldwide is the video-conferencing platform that connects groups of students in diverse locations to an instructor in one of the classrooms or teaching from home. This study focuses on the issues inherent in the distance between students and instructor while attempting to replicate other published experiences. Exam scores in flipped, non-flipped, and online courses without the videos are compared.

Proposal Description

Distance instruction is not always amenable to curricular interventions that work in traditional classrooms. ERAU-Worldwide has few self-contained classrooms and many online classes; the focus of this study is the EagleVision (EV) courses that use Adobe Connect conferencing platform to create virtual classes combining small, distributed classrooms or individual students on their home computers. The advantages reported in research literature on flipping calculus classes warrant investigation in the EV learning environment.

The course under study is College Math for Aviation II, an early Calculus class focused on polynomial functions. Flipping a class means that the students will study the sections being covered before they come to class and class time will be used working problems and answering questions. Recorded video lectures and a quiz were posted in the University’s learning management system, expecting students to watch the lecture (and demonstrate learning through the quiz) before attending class.

We had two main research questions:

  1. Will required video lectures allow for more student engagement in practice during synchronous meeting time?
  2. Will it also result in better exam scores?

Additionally, we wondered if requiring the lectures in an online course improved exam scores.

To answer these questions a mix of qualitative data (end of term student survey, instructor interview) and quantitative data (exam scores) was collected from an instructor teaching both EV and online. Exam scores from non-flipped EV and online courses without videos is being collected for comparison. Initial results suggest that engagement was improved and achievement is at least as good. It is worth further investigation through wider implementation.

To engage the session audience, a simple algebra problem will be given to small groups. While they are working the problem we will ask a series of why questions to illustrate time used to help students understand their final answer.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 29th, 4:00 PM Mar 29th, 5:00 PM

Flipping a Distance Learning Calculus Class

Numerous instructors have moved part of the instruction outside class meetings in order to provide more classtime for collaborative or supervised problem-solving and skill-building, often reporting dramatic improvement in the areas of retention, engagement, and achievement. The additional challenge faced by ERAU-Worldwide is the video-conferencing platform that connects groups of students in diverse locations to an instructor in one of the classrooms or teaching from home. This study focuses on the issues inherent in the distance between students and instructor while attempting to replicate other published experiences. Exam scores in flipped, non-flipped, and online courses without the videos are compared.