Proposal Title

Delivery Format Effectiveness (Traditional, Hybrid, Online) - Student learning and perceptions

Co-Authors

N/A

Track

Research Proposal / Teaching with Technology

Proposal Abstract

The current project examined the relative effectiveness of onsite and online course delivery in terms of (1) aligned learning assessments, and (2) student perceptions of learning and course content/structure effectiveness. A hybrid formatted course was also included in the comparison. One instructor taught all three sections during the same semester, using the same materials. A research assistant blind to the aims/design of the study, and to participant condition, graded all assessments. Student survey responses remained anonymous to the instructor/experimenter. Results showed equivalent outcomes across groups on learning outcomes, and interesting differences in patterns of student perceptions across presentation formats.

Proposal Description

Online instruction is quickly becoming as important a facet of higher education as the traditional, face-to-face delivery format of classroom instruction. Bernard, Borokhovski & Tamim (2014) reported that online instruction leads to similar effects relative to onsite education, while blended courses showing slight increases. These authors also suggest that the question should not be, "are there differences," but what factors make a difference and may improve outcomes across all three delivery methods.

The current project directly compared the effectiveness of traditional, hybrid, and online course presentations in terms of (1) measurable, aligned learning assessments, and (2) student perceptions of learning and course content/structure effectiveness. One instructor (the experimenter) taught all three sections of an undergraduate psychology course (Introductory Behavioral Neuroscience) during the same semester, using the same course materials. A research assistant blind to the aims/design of the study, and to participant conditions graded all learning assessments. Student survey responses were also anonymous to the instructor/experimenter.

Data analyses are currently in progress. Preliminary results show equivalent outcomes across groups on learning outcomes; however, interesting differences in patterns of student perceptions across presentation formats have been found. Further analyses will be conducted to clarify those patterns and evaluate the association between perceptions of and use of different course elements and learning outcomes.

The implications of these findings will be used to structure the presentation of this poster. Several individual elements of the course were surveyed, and some proved to be more important for online presentation, and others more important for the traditional and/or blended format. These patterns will be summarized and highlighted. The application of these results should assist others in course design as they are either developing new online/blended courses, or transitioning from traditional presentations to the online/blended formats.

Session Format

Poster Session

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 29th, 4:00 PM Mar 29th, 5:00 PM

Delivery Format Effectiveness (Traditional, Hybrid, Online) - Student learning and perceptions

The current project examined the relative effectiveness of onsite and online course delivery in terms of (1) aligned learning assessments, and (2) student perceptions of learning and course content/structure effectiveness. A hybrid formatted course was also included in the comparison. One instructor taught all three sections during the same semester, using the same materials. A research assistant blind to the aims/design of the study, and to participant condition, graded all assessments. Student survey responses remained anonymous to the instructor/experimenter. Results showed equivalent outcomes across groups on learning outcomes, and interesting differences in patterns of student perceptions across presentation formats.