Proposal Title

Using a Growth Mindset to Improve Certification Scores

Track

Research Proposal / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

Currently, this is little research that determines if teaching college students about a growth mindset can improve scores on certification tests. This mixed methods study was designed to determine if informing college students about a growth mindset can improve their perceptions of themselves and therefore increase their practice certification test scores. Data collection included PPR practice test scores, two questionnaires, and a mind-set quiz for a control group, an experimental group, and a comparison group. The results of this study suggest that students who participated in the mindset workshop improved their practice test scores more than those who did not.

Proposal Description

A growth mindset is the belief that intelligence can be changed over time (Dweck, 2010). Research suggest that students who hold a growth mindset show improvement and growth over the students who hold a fixed mindset, i.e., the belief that intelligence and skill level are set and therefore unchangeable) (Dweck, 2008; O’Rourke, Haimovitz, Ballweber, Dweck, & Popovi´c, 2014). Yet, very little research has been conducted to determine if teaching about a growth mindset can improve certification test scores. Therefore, we want to determine if informing pre-service teachers about a growth mindset could improve their self-perceptions of themselves as learners and therefore increase their practice certification test scores.

Mixed methods research methodology was used for this study. Data collection included current PPR practice test scores, post-intervention PPR practice test scores, pre-intervention questionnaire and post-intervention questionnaires, and a mindset quiz for a control group of 15 students, an experimental group of 15 students, and a comparison group of 15 students. The experimental and control groups were made up of students who failed at least one part of the PPR practice certification test. The experimental group participated in a workshop about the growth mindset, while the control group and comparison group (students who passed the practice test) were provided with no intervention.

The results of this study suggest that students who participated in the mindset workshop improved their practice test scores more than those who did not. The objectives of the presentation are to use active learning strategies (e.g., think-pair-share and pass-the-paper) to share the results of the study, offer attendees recommendations for implementing improving test scores by teaching about a growth mindset, and participate in an activity wherein attendees can plan how they might implement aspects of the growth mindset into the college classroom.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 1

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

Share

COinS
 
Mar 29th, 2:00 PM Mar 29th, 2:45 PM

Using a Growth Mindset to Improve Certification Scores

Room 1

Currently, this is little research that determines if teaching college students about a growth mindset can improve scores on certification tests. This mixed methods study was designed to determine if informing college students about a growth mindset can improve their perceptions of themselves and therefore increase their practice certification test scores. Data collection included PPR practice test scores, two questionnaires, and a mind-set quiz for a control group, an experimental group, and a comparison group. The results of this study suggest that students who participated in the mindset workshop improved their practice test scores more than those who did not.