Proposal Title

Inter-connectivity of a University Writing Initiative, Assessment, and SoTL

Track

Non-Research Proposal / About SoTL

Proposal Abstract

In this panel session, we will describe how SoTL research helped the University connect assessment with the teaching and learning processes and provided an opportunity for faculty to receive greater recognition for engaging in these processes. Additionally, faculty from three Colleges will respond to questions pertaining to their “what works” studies that focus on teaching and learning, methodologies, the evolution of their SoTL research, and their results. A fourth faculty member will respond to questions pertaining to her “what is” study, describing methods used to investigate how and why students’ self-perceptions change within specific courses (Chick, n.d).

Proposal Description

During an exploration of strategies to foster faculty members’ deeper understanding of the relationships between the teaching and learning process and the assessment process and to create opportunities for faculty to receive greater recognition for engaging in assessment, the Office of Institutional Effectiveness (OIE) was given the responsibility of coordinating a University-wide initiative to develop students’ deeper cognitive skills through writing. Realizing this new initiative may provide the means to effectively demonstrate the connections between assessment and teaching and learning, and recognizing connections between SoTL and assessment, OIE analyzed components of the writing-thinking initiative, the assessment process, and SoTL. After identifying the commonalities, OIE began implementing efforts to emphasize meaningful connections among the three, while stressing the potential benefits to faculty members and student learning.

This panel reflects the initial results of OIE’s strategies to connect:

1) specific teaching strategies, supported in the writing and pedagogical literature to foster complex cognitive skills through writing, introduced in faculty development opportunities to advance the initiative,

2) assessment processes emphasizing the teaching and learning connection, and

3) the processes and procedures of SoTL (Chick, n.d.).

Although scholars (Dickson and Treml, 2013; Hutchings, 2010) have written about the relationships between assessment and SoTL, OIE proposed, in its own assessment processes, that by helping faculty coordinate these processes, faculty and students will receive greater benefits, in comparison to considering any of these three processes separately.

In this panel discussion, faculty from three different Colleges will respond to questions pertaining to their “what works” studies that focus on teaching and learning, methodologies, the evolution of their SoTL research, and their results. A fourth faculty member will respond to questions pertaining to her “what is” study, describing methods used to investigate how and why students’ self-perceptions change within specific courses (Chick, n.d.).

References

Chick, N. (n.d.). Scholarship of teaching and learning: A guide from the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching. Retrieved from https://my.vanderbilt.edu/sotl/

Dickson, K. L., & Treml, M. M. (2013). Using assessment and SoTL to enhance student learning. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2013(136), 7-16. doi: 10.1002/tl.20072

Hutchings, P. (2010). Opening doors to faculty involvement in assessment. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois and Indiana University, National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA). Retrieved from http://www.learningoutcomeassessment.org/documents/PatHutchings.pdf

Session Format

Panel Session

Location

Room 4

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

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Mar 29th, 10:00 AM Mar 29th, 10:45 AM

Inter-connectivity of a University Writing Initiative, Assessment, and SoTL

Room 4

In this panel session, we will describe how SoTL research helped the University connect assessment with the teaching and learning processes and provided an opportunity for faculty to receive greater recognition for engaging in these processes. Additionally, faculty from three Colleges will respond to questions pertaining to their “what works” studies that focus on teaching and learning, methodologies, the evolution of their SoTL research, and their results. A fourth faculty member will respond to questions pertaining to her “what is” study, describing methods used to investigate how and why students’ self-perceptions change within specific courses (Chick, n.d).