Proposal Title

Statistical Research on Active Learning in Teaching Statistics

Track

Research Proposal / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

Active learning strategies strengthen teaching in higher education. Many strategies have been proposed in recent years and are being implemented primarily in teaching sciences. Even though a vast amount of educational research is accumulating constantly, rigorous statistical analysis of many of these strategies have a moderate presence in literature. The presentation will focus on a comprehensive statistical analysis in a comparative pilot study containing strategies modified from the Conceptual Change Model (CCM) and Team Based Learning (TBL). It compared the effectiveness of the strategies in teaching a junior level statistics course designed for students in mathematics or related majors.

Proposal Description

Student learning depends on the mode of teaching and a topic. One naturally expects a relation between the two. A pilot study conducted in Fall 2015 employed modified strategies of Conceptual Change Model (CCM) and Team Based Learning (TBL) in a junior level statistics course. CCM is grounded on "conceptual conflict” as described by Hewson et al. (1984) where learning is induced by confronting misconceptions. Statistics requires inferential thinking and inferences are vulnerable to misconceptions. Therefore, CCM is suitable in teaching statistical inference. TBL is a group strategy that has shown success in teaching sciences since Michaelsen et al. (2002). TBL is governed by protocols for effectiveness, whereas CCM can be assimilated to a traditional activity. CCM is content specific, while TBL is comprehensive. They vary in modality, but the study posed no challenges as it merely compared the strategies for effectiveness. The study compared them by constraining on topic difficulty. The difficulty level was classified into Easy, Medium and Hard based on instructional experience. In-class activities were administered using the strategies. Students were later tested, using homework assignments and exams, on questions of varying difficulty on topics taught using the two strategies. Scores from these assignments were used to assess the strategies in addressing a particular topic. The data revealed a statistically significant interaction between a strategy and the topic difficulty. The strategies had different effects on students classified primarily by performance. These vital findings offer an insight in choosing an appropriate strategy while offering a personalized, targeted learning environment. The pilot study is being continued in lower level statistics students to increase effective learning during their formative years.The presentation will disseminate the results of the study and its future. It is expected to be an actively engaged discussion and an opportunity to receive feedback for future improvements.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 5

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

Share

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 10:00 AM Mar 30th, 10:45 AM

Statistical Research on Active Learning in Teaching Statistics

Room 5

Active learning strategies strengthen teaching in higher education. Many strategies have been proposed in recent years and are being implemented primarily in teaching sciences. Even though a vast amount of educational research is accumulating constantly, rigorous statistical analysis of many of these strategies have a moderate presence in literature. The presentation will focus on a comprehensive statistical analysis in a comparative pilot study containing strategies modified from the Conceptual Change Model (CCM) and Team Based Learning (TBL). It compared the effectiveness of the strategies in teaching a junior level statistics course designed for students in mathematics or related majors.