Proposal Title

Transforming Classroom Learning through Intentional Faculty and Staff Collaborations

Co-Authors

n/a

Track

Research Project / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

In an innovative approach to Ambrose et al.’s (2010) strategies for creating a productive course climate, a composition instructor and a student affairs professional combined backwards design (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005) and student development theory (Evans, 2010) to determine whether strategic in-class interventions could help students overcome stalled classroom discussions, an inability to explore difficult subjects, and unproductive group dynamics. The presenters utilized a mixed methods approach, combining student perception data and instructor’s primary observations. Primary observations yielded indicators that the treatment section benefited from the interventions. They will recap the course development process, recruitment of student affairs partners, and the impact of this approach. Assessments included pre and post surveys based on the Student Development Task and Lifestyle Assessment and observational notes documenting student processes, questions, and interactions.

Participants will engage in small group discussions regarding “stalled” learning and brainstorm potential student affairs partners. Following this session, participants will recognize that:

- It is possible to re-conceptualize optional, discrete student development workshops as in-class curriculum.

- Instructors should pro-actively offer developmental interventions to help students navigate difficult ideas and still learn content.

- Partnering with student affairs offers a wider variety of solutions for combating non-cognitive obstacles to learning.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 217

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 31st, 10:00 AM Mar 31st, 10:45 AM

Transforming Classroom Learning through Intentional Faculty and Staff Collaborations

Room 217

In an innovative approach to Ambrose et al.’s (2010) strategies for creating a productive course climate, a composition instructor and a student affairs professional combined backwards design (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005) and student development theory (Evans, 2010) to determine whether strategic in-class interventions could help students overcome stalled classroom discussions, an inability to explore difficult subjects, and unproductive group dynamics. The presenters utilized a mixed methods approach, combining student perception data and instructor’s primary observations. Primary observations yielded indicators that the treatment section benefited from the interventions. They will recap the course development process, recruitment of student affairs partners, and the impact of this approach. Assessments included pre and post surveys based on the Student Development Task and Lifestyle Assessment and observational notes documenting student processes, questions, and interactions.

Participants will engage in small group discussions regarding “stalled” learning and brainstorm potential student affairs partners. Following this session, participants will recognize that:

- It is possible to re-conceptualize optional, discrete student development workshops as in-class curriculum.

- Instructors should pro-actively offer developmental interventions to help students navigate difficult ideas and still learn content.

- Partnering with student affairs offers a wider variety of solutions for combating non-cognitive obstacles to learning.