Proposal Title

Blended Course Design's Impact on Student Attainment of Learning Outcomes

Co-Authors

Ronald Carriveau, University of North Texas

Track

Research Project / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

There is always room for improvement. In the classroom, improvement can be made in several ways including the way in which information is presented to students, how students are assessed in a course, or even how the classroom is physically laid out. Research has proven that in today’s classroom, students prefer to be taught by interactive lectures and group-based activities. But before instructors change their methods of teaching to accommodate today’s students’ preferences, we should know whether or not the changes will affect the students’ attainment of student learning outcomes. This session will focus on effects that course redesign of instructional and learning strategies has had on student attainment of learning outcomes in an introductory course taught over five semesters between 2011 and 2015. Data for the study were collected at the end of each semester from two semesters of face-to-face teaching and three semesters taught in the flipped classroom model. Outcome attainment values were produced after students’ responses to test items were directly measured to specific learning outcomes (Carriveau, 2010). The measure of success for each of the courses comes from these outcome attainment values rather than grades, which is a unique approach in terms of existing research.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 212

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 31st, 11:00 AM Mar 31st, 11:45 AM

Blended Course Design's Impact on Student Attainment of Learning Outcomes

Room 212

There is always room for improvement. In the classroom, improvement can be made in several ways including the way in which information is presented to students, how students are assessed in a course, or even how the classroom is physically laid out. Research has proven that in today’s classroom, students prefer to be taught by interactive lectures and group-based activities. But before instructors change their methods of teaching to accommodate today’s students’ preferences, we should know whether or not the changes will affect the students’ attainment of student learning outcomes. This session will focus on effects that course redesign of instructional and learning strategies has had on student attainment of learning outcomes in an introductory course taught over five semesters between 2011 and 2015. Data for the study were collected at the end of each semester from two semesters of face-to-face teaching and three semesters taught in the flipped classroom model. Outcome attainment values were produced after students’ responses to test items were directly measured to specific learning outcomes (Carriveau, 2010). The measure of success for each of the courses comes from these outcome attainment values rather than grades, which is a unique approach in terms of existing research.