Proposal Title

Using Online Quizzes for Formative Assessment in a Medicine Clerkship

Co-Authors

Tina Younger, MD

Track

Research Project / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

The use of a web-based examination system for medical student self-assessment and self-directed learning can be an invaluable tool for clerkship programs. Quizzes benefit students preparing for end-of-clerkship shelf exams, affords students with immediate feedback and review of the week’s didactic material and allow clerkship directors to gage students’ learning and clinical knowledge. Quizzes are faculty-authored, take-home, self-paced and open-book format. Students receive answers and rationale after completing each quiz via the exam system. Use of a proprietary Web-based exam system served three main purposes: (1) to develop a database of questions for Medicine clerkship exam practice and self-assessment; (2) to provide formative feedback to students and the clerkship director regarding student clinical knowledge; and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of the quizzes in preparing students for their end-of-clerkship shelf examination. The author will present examples of quiz content, delivery methods and student feedback about self-directed learning. The presentation will also include performance data on quizzes and mean shelf exam data since July 2015. Conclusion: While the data fail to show evidence of improving end-of-clerkship exam scores, online quizzes can be used as a standard tool for clerkships in gaging student learning and gaps in knowledge.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 113

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 30th, 4:00 PM Mar 30th, 5:00 PM

Using Online Quizzes for Formative Assessment in a Medicine Clerkship

Room 113

The use of a web-based examination system for medical student self-assessment and self-directed learning can be an invaluable tool for clerkship programs. Quizzes benefit students preparing for end-of-clerkship shelf exams, affords students with immediate feedback and review of the week’s didactic material and allow clerkship directors to gage students’ learning and clinical knowledge. Quizzes are faculty-authored, take-home, self-paced and open-book format. Students receive answers and rationale after completing each quiz via the exam system. Use of a proprietary Web-based exam system served three main purposes: (1) to develop a database of questions for Medicine clerkship exam practice and self-assessment; (2) to provide formative feedback to students and the clerkship director regarding student clinical knowledge; and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of the quizzes in preparing students for their end-of-clerkship shelf examination. The author will present examples of quiz content, delivery methods and student feedback about self-directed learning. The presentation will also include performance data on quizzes and mean shelf exam data since July 2015. Conclusion: While the data fail to show evidence of improving end-of-clerkship exam scores, online quizzes can be used as a standard tool for clerkships in gaging student learning and gaps in knowledge.