Proposal Title

"The Loop": An Ongoing Process to Encourage Reflective Engagement

Co-Authors

N/A

Track

Research Project / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

All instructors have received student essays and other documents that, rather than answering assignments or writing prompts, seem to come from somewhere else entirely. These misperceptions are more pronounced in online courses where it is difficult to gauge levels of understanding (Coomey & Stephenson 2001). However, these missed assignments became an opportunity to research different pedagogical methods and assess improvements (Comeaux 2004). Our research seeks to explore the design principles that can accommodate and support learning outcomes in online settings where the need for learner engagement is paramount to learning success (Herrington, et al 2003). We have worked on creating a checking-in system, called “the Loop.” In doing so, we have sought to ensure greater student understanding of assignments through pre-assignment questions and quizzes followed up with student reflection of the assignment. In this 3-step process, we have improved student focus and assessed how these skills and assignment relate beyond the immediate task. Student critical thinking, research and writing skills have increased as shown through improvements on assignments and pre- and post- course assessments. The survey tool allowed the collection of data for further research and assessment as students were questioned about their experiences affording the opportunity for increased engagement. It is our goal to discuss how we have implemented “the Loop” in different ways to fit within the needs of 3 different disciplines—History, Technical Communication, and Argument—with enrollments from 20 to 150 students and to present the results of this data during the presentation.

Session Format

Panel Session

Location

Room 211

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Apr 1st, 12:00 PM Apr 1st, 12:45 PM

"The Loop": An Ongoing Process to Encourage Reflective Engagement

Room 211

All instructors have received student essays and other documents that, rather than answering assignments or writing prompts, seem to come from somewhere else entirely. These misperceptions are more pronounced in online courses where it is difficult to gauge levels of understanding (Coomey & Stephenson 2001). However, these missed assignments became an opportunity to research different pedagogical methods and assess improvements (Comeaux 2004). Our research seeks to explore the design principles that can accommodate and support learning outcomes in online settings where the need for learner engagement is paramount to learning success (Herrington, et al 2003). We have worked on creating a checking-in system, called “the Loop.” In doing so, we have sought to ensure greater student understanding of assignments through pre-assignment questions and quizzes followed up with student reflection of the assignment. In this 3-step process, we have improved student focus and assessed how these skills and assignment relate beyond the immediate task. Student critical thinking, research and writing skills have increased as shown through improvements on assignments and pre- and post- course assessments. The survey tool allowed the collection of data for further research and assessment as students were questioned about their experiences affording the opportunity for increased engagement. It is our goal to discuss how we have implemented “the Loop” in different ways to fit within the needs of 3 different disciplines—History, Technical Communication, and Argument—with enrollments from 20 to 150 students and to present the results of this data during the presentation.