Proposal Title

Grading Smarter while Students Learn

Co-Authors

None

Track

Research Project / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

The presenter designed assignments based on aspects of the brain that encourage students to make connections between concepts and are easy for the instructor to grade. This mixed-methods study used a questionnaire with twelve 5-point Likert scale questions and eight open-ended questions. The results of this study, which included 27 education undergraduate students, indicated that students put in a lot of effort on these assignments, were okay with receiving less feedback, learned as much (if not more) on these assignments as typical course assignments, and preferred that other professors use similar assignments. In addition, when asked about preferences on the feedback that students receive in a classes, students suggested that their grade is not more important than the feedback that they receive and would rather receive more feedback and the professor take more time to grade than less feedback with an assignment returned quickly. The objectives of the presentation are to use active teaching strategies (e.g., think-pair-share and fish bowl discussions) to: (a) share the results of the study and (b) have participants participate in this type of assignments and plan how they could implement this type of assignment in their classes.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 217

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 31st, 11:00 AM Mar 31st, 11:45 AM

Grading Smarter while Students Learn

Room 217

The presenter designed assignments based on aspects of the brain that encourage students to make connections between concepts and are easy for the instructor to grade. This mixed-methods study used a questionnaire with twelve 5-point Likert scale questions and eight open-ended questions. The results of this study, which included 27 education undergraduate students, indicated that students put in a lot of effort on these assignments, were okay with receiving less feedback, learned as much (if not more) on these assignments as typical course assignments, and preferred that other professors use similar assignments. In addition, when asked about preferences on the feedback that students receive in a classes, students suggested that their grade is not more important than the feedback that they receive and would rather receive more feedback and the professor take more time to grade than less feedback with an assignment returned quickly. The objectives of the presentation are to use active teaching strategies (e.g., think-pair-share and fish bowl discussions) to: (a) share the results of the study and (b) have participants participate in this type of assignments and plan how they could implement this type of assignment in their classes.