Proposal Title

Student Perceptions of Learning and Engagement During Curricular Change

Co-Authors

None

Track

Research Project / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

As part of the assessment of a curriculum redesign in a general education, two-course humanities sequence, we surveyed students (n > 800) during the three semesters of curricular change about their engagement and their perceptions of learning. The panel will report on our findings.

One panelist will discuss the aggregate dataset and compare our findings to similar studies of student engagement. Another will report on student engagement and perceptions of learning as the curriculum changed: students who experienced one course in the initial format and one in the revised format were more negative in their evaluations than those who experienced the courses in only one format. The third panelist will report the data on our attempt to establish student perceptions on different levels of learning and forms of engagement. We found that students tended to discriminate neither between different levels of knowledge on Bloom’ taxonomy nor among different forms of engagement in learning.

Audience members will be asked to examine the findings in the context of their own experience, to generate possible explanations for some unexpected findings, and to pose pedagogical solutions to issues that emerged from them.

Session Format

Panel Session

Location

Room 211

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 30th, 2:00 PM Mar 30th, 2:45 PM

Student Perceptions of Learning and Engagement During Curricular Change

Room 211

As part of the assessment of a curriculum redesign in a general education, two-course humanities sequence, we surveyed students (n > 800) during the three semesters of curricular change about their engagement and their perceptions of learning. The panel will report on our findings.

One panelist will discuss the aggregate dataset and compare our findings to similar studies of student engagement. Another will report on student engagement and perceptions of learning as the curriculum changed: students who experienced one course in the initial format and one in the revised format were more negative in their evaluations than those who experienced the courses in only one format. The third panelist will report the data on our attempt to establish student perceptions on different levels of learning and forms of engagement. We found that students tended to discriminate neither between different levels of knowledge on Bloom’ taxonomy nor among different forms of engagement in learning.

Audience members will be asked to examine the findings in the context of their own experience, to generate possible explanations for some unexpected findings, and to pose pedagogical solutions to issues that emerged from them.