Proposal Title

Students’ Perception of the Effectiveness of Measures used to Prevent Cheating in the Online Classroom.

Co-Authors

Dr. Lesley Morgan

Track

Research Project / Online Learning

Proposal Abstract

Cheating in the online classroom is a concern for faculty and administrators in higher education. Although many different deterrents to cheating have been instituted, effectiveness of these deterrents is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to describe how effective online students rank commonly used strategies to prevent cheating in online courses. This is a descriptive web survey with students from a private not for profit academic institution. The survey was completed by 1008 students from associate to doctoral degree programs. These students came from various disciplines, including nursing. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis and content analysis of open ended responses. Students ranked engaged learning assignments as the most effective in deterring cheating in online courses. Students expressed concern about legal and privacy issues associated with high technology deterrents such as remote proctoring devices and data mining software. Recommendations for practice include using engaged learning strategies and proctored test centers. Future research should continue to evaluate the effectiveness of emerging technologies designed to reduce online cheating.

Session Format

Poster Session

Location

Room 113

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 30th, 4:00 PM Mar 30th, 5:00 PM

Students’ Perception of the Effectiveness of Measures used to Prevent Cheating in the Online Classroom.

Room 113

Cheating in the online classroom is a concern for faculty and administrators in higher education. Although many different deterrents to cheating have been instituted, effectiveness of these deterrents is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to describe how effective online students rank commonly used strategies to prevent cheating in online courses. This is a descriptive web survey with students from a private not for profit academic institution. The survey was completed by 1008 students from associate to doctoral degree programs. These students came from various disciplines, including nursing. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis and content analysis of open ended responses. Students ranked engaged learning assignments as the most effective in deterring cheating in online courses. Students expressed concern about legal and privacy issues associated with high technology deterrents such as remote proctoring devices and data mining software. Recommendations for practice include using engaged learning strategies and proctored test centers. Future research should continue to evaluate the effectiveness of emerging technologies designed to reduce online cheating.