Proposal Title

Cross-Correlation Study of Grades in Calculus I

Co-Authors

Mahmood, Hajara

Ludu, Andrei

Track

Research Project / Teaching with Technology

Proposal Abstract

Presentation of students’ assessments results in Calculus I face-to-face classes from online recitation and discussion board before the lecture. Understand the possibility to compensate face-to-face time, and help clarify subject matters maintaining learning quality, and optimizing class time. Periodically issued trends, carefully synchronized with online homework, offered students the frame to practice applications and solve problems. Monitoring students’ participation allowed us to identify topics they don’t master yet or they have weaknesses. The complete students’ online participation in discussions and assignment solving were recorded and correlated with their cumulative grades and also with the intensity and frequency of their in class participation. The statistics analysis of these time series showed that almost any significant online participation, motivated by the desire to do well and understand, can be correlated with an increase in class participation and questioning. From the study of correlation between participation in online discussions and the final exam average grade and student retention we observed consistency in the group of participants to the end of semester, increased class participation and peer discussions, signs of ownership over the beginning of the lecture, and increased interest on completing homework. This approach can be extended to any STEM classes.

Session Format

Poster Session

Location

Room 113

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 30th, 4:00 PM Mar 30th, 5:00 PM

Cross-Correlation Study of Grades in Calculus I

Room 113

Presentation of students’ assessments results in Calculus I face-to-face classes from online recitation and discussion board before the lecture. Understand the possibility to compensate face-to-face time, and help clarify subject matters maintaining learning quality, and optimizing class time. Periodically issued trends, carefully synchronized with online homework, offered students the frame to practice applications and solve problems. Monitoring students’ participation allowed us to identify topics they don’t master yet or they have weaknesses. The complete students’ online participation in discussions and assignment solving were recorded and correlated with their cumulative grades and also with the intensity and frequency of their in class participation. The statistics analysis of these time series showed that almost any significant online participation, motivated by the desire to do well and understand, can be correlated with an increase in class participation and questioning. From the study of correlation between participation in online discussions and the final exam average grade and student retention we observed consistency in the group of participants to the end of semester, increased class participation and peer discussions, signs of ownership over the beginning of the lecture, and increased interest on completing homework. This approach can be extended to any STEM classes.