Co-Authors

NA

Track

Research Project / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

This qualitative case study used Brown’s (2008) Conceptions of Assessment as a lens to better understand how humanities faculty are engaging the assessment movement in their general education programs. Much of the research on this topic suggests that there is a great deal of resistance to assessment in the humanities; however, my findings suggest it is not a resistance to assessment as a concept, but to the implementation of the assessment process that is most discouraging to faculty. Findings suggest that the practical use of the assessment data beyond reporting was absent. Further, the lack of shared governance in the process negatively affected faculty engagement with general education assessment. There are some very practical and not overly burdensome techniques to address many faculty concerns and to create an assessment program that is not only beneficial to the institution, but more importantly, useful to the students and faculty. Faculty and administrators in higher education can find relevance in this study’s findings to improve general education assessment processes, and in garnering faculty buy-in and support for assessment initiatives. Audience members will be encouraged to share their experiences and discuss successful strategies used to encourage quality assessment.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 212

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 31st, 11:00 AM Mar 31st, 11:45 AM

Humanities Professors’ Conceptions of Assessment in General Education

Room 212

This qualitative case study used Brown’s (2008) Conceptions of Assessment as a lens to better understand how humanities faculty are engaging the assessment movement in their general education programs. Much of the research on this topic suggests that there is a great deal of resistance to assessment in the humanities; however, my findings suggest it is not a resistance to assessment as a concept, but to the implementation of the assessment process that is most discouraging to faculty. Findings suggest that the practical use of the assessment data beyond reporting was absent. Further, the lack of shared governance in the process negatively affected faculty engagement with general education assessment. There are some very practical and not overly burdensome techniques to address many faculty concerns and to create an assessment program that is not only beneficial to the institution, but more importantly, useful to the students and faculty. Faculty and administrators in higher education can find relevance in this study’s findings to improve general education assessment processes, and in garnering faculty buy-in and support for assessment initiatives. Audience members will be encouraged to share their experiences and discuss successful strategies used to encourage quality assessment.