Proposal Title

High School Academic Records and College GPAs as Predictors of Student Enrollment in and Success in Online, Hybrid, and Traditional Sections of American History Survey Courses

Co-Authors

N/A

Track

Research Project / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

Investigators at Georgia State are engaged in a multi-year experiment on the impact of digital resources on student learning in introductory history classes taken by five thousand GSU students each academic year. As part of this larger project, data from high school GPAs, ACT/SAT scores, and GSU campus GPAs have been compiled for 2,500 students enrolled in 101 sections of the U.S. survey course (History 2110) in the Fall 2015 semester. These measures of students’ previous academic performances and level of readiness for coursework in higher education have been correlated with data from students’ date of registration and final grades for History 2110 with an eye toward examining whether:

1. Students with particular academic backgrounds are more or less likely to enroll in online course sections as opposed to hybrid or traditional sections

2. Students with particular academic backgrounds experience measurably different outcomes in History 2110

3. Students with particular academic backgrounds do better or worse than expected (given the aggregate statistical patterns) when enrolled in online, hybrid, or traditional sections

4. Students with particular academic backgrounds are, in online, hybrid, or traditional sections, more or less likely to have course outcomes that diverge significantly from the individual students’ campus GPAs

Session Format

Poster Session

Location

Room 113

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 30th, 4:00 PM Mar 30th, 5:00 PM

High School Academic Records and College GPAs as Predictors of Student Enrollment in and Success in Online, Hybrid, and Traditional Sections of American History Survey Courses

Room 113

Investigators at Georgia State are engaged in a multi-year experiment on the impact of digital resources on student learning in introductory history classes taken by five thousand GSU students each academic year. As part of this larger project, data from high school GPAs, ACT/SAT scores, and GSU campus GPAs have been compiled for 2,500 students enrolled in 101 sections of the U.S. survey course (History 2110) in the Fall 2015 semester. These measures of students’ previous academic performances and level of readiness for coursework in higher education have been correlated with data from students’ date of registration and final grades for History 2110 with an eye toward examining whether:

1. Students with particular academic backgrounds are more or less likely to enroll in online course sections as opposed to hybrid or traditional sections

2. Students with particular academic backgrounds experience measurably different outcomes in History 2110

3. Students with particular academic backgrounds do better or worse than expected (given the aggregate statistical patterns) when enrolled in online, hybrid, or traditional sections

4. Students with particular academic backgrounds are, in online, hybrid, or traditional sections, more or less likely to have course outcomes that diverge significantly from the individual students’ campus GPAs