Co-Authors

Carolee A. Larsen

Track

Research Project / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

We will present a problem-based learning model (PBL) designed to promote postformal problem-solving skills among college students in a U.S. history survey course/first-year learning community and we will review results from two studies in which the outcomes of the PBL model were compared to the outcomes of the same course taught with traditional lecture/discussion. The PBL model was more effective in scaffolding students to recognize and practice postformal thinking dynamics and in facilitating self-reported student perceptions of increased course engagement and content relevance. A procedural overview of one of the PBL activities and the metacognitive reflection guide used in our research will be shared. We will also share a short video clip that demonstrates cognitive outcomes among students in the studies along with a summary of results and student comments on the impact the PBL model had on their thinking in and out of the classroom, their level of course engagement, and their perceptions of content relevance. The session will conclude with a Q&A segment focusing on implementations of our PBL model, our research, and the potential applicability of the model in general education curricula.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 217

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 30th, 10:00 AM Mar 30th, 10:45 AM

Facilitating Advanced Thinking Skills through Problem-Based Learning

Room 217

We will present a problem-based learning model (PBL) designed to promote postformal problem-solving skills among college students in a U.S. history survey course/first-year learning community and we will review results from two studies in which the outcomes of the PBL model were compared to the outcomes of the same course taught with traditional lecture/discussion. The PBL model was more effective in scaffolding students to recognize and practice postformal thinking dynamics and in facilitating self-reported student perceptions of increased course engagement and content relevance. A procedural overview of one of the PBL activities and the metacognitive reflection guide used in our research will be shared. We will also share a short video clip that demonstrates cognitive outcomes among students in the studies along with a summary of results and student comments on the impact the PBL model had on their thinking in and out of the classroom, their level of course engagement, and their perceptions of content relevance. The session will conclude with a Q&A segment focusing on implementations of our PBL model, our research, and the potential applicability of the model in general education curricula.