Co-Authors

Chris Geiger, Florida Gulf Coast University

Track

Research Project / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

One methodology researchers have used to reduce or reverse poor retention rates is near-peer mentoring. Studies have shown that acting as a near-peer mentor aided in the mentor’s academic growth and was suggested to be a promising prospect for student retention. Kuh et al. have also demonstrated that the educationally purposeful activities described in the National Survey of Student Engagement, produced a statistically significant increase in first year grades, and second year persistence (2008). A recent review of mentoring programs (Gershenfeld, 2014) suggests that more rigorous research should be completed, particularly with respect to the assessment of the social validity of the programs.

The revised introductory course at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) integrates upper level students as near-peer mentors. The addition of these mentors to the class is designed to allow freshman to more easily find their fit within the college and increase retention. The social validity of the program is evaluated through a mixed method approach including the use of pre and post surveys of the students enrolled in the course and focus group discussions with the students serving as near-peer mentors. The impact of these relationships on student self-efficacy and the future direction of the program will also be included.

Session Format

Poster Session

Location

Room 113

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Mar 31st, 4:00 PM Mar 31st, 5:00 PM

The Impact of Near – Peer Mentoring in an Introductory Course

Room 113

One methodology researchers have used to reduce or reverse poor retention rates is near-peer mentoring. Studies have shown that acting as a near-peer mentor aided in the mentor’s academic growth and was suggested to be a promising prospect for student retention. Kuh et al. have also demonstrated that the educationally purposeful activities described in the National Survey of Student Engagement, produced a statistically significant increase in first year grades, and second year persistence (2008). A recent review of mentoring programs (Gershenfeld, 2014) suggests that more rigorous research should be completed, particularly with respect to the assessment of the social validity of the programs.

The revised introductory course at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) integrates upper level students as near-peer mentors. The addition of these mentors to the class is designed to allow freshman to more easily find their fit within the college and increase retention. The social validity of the program is evaluated through a mixed method approach including the use of pre and post surveys of the students enrolled in the course and focus group discussions with the students serving as near-peer mentors. The impact of these relationships on student self-efficacy and the future direction of the program will also be included.