Proposal Title

Immediacy Behavior in the Online Classroom: Effects on Student Performance and Engagement

Proposal Abstract

Prior research (e.g., Wilson, 2006; Wilson & Taylor, 2001) suggests that immediacy behaviors of instructors are associated with increased grades and satisfaction with both the course and the instructor. The use of immediacy behaviors in the classroom increases student satisfaction and even student grades (Wilson, 2006; Wilson & Taylor, 2001).

Although the effectiveness of immediacy behaviors in the classroom has been well documented, it is not clear how online instructors can make use of these in-class immediacy behaviors. Most immediacy behaviors, such as looking at the class when talking and moving around the classroom when teaching are not transferable to online settings. The question becomes, how can online instructors take advantage of the effectiveness of immediacy behaviors in online, asynchronous, distance learning classes. And, can immediacy behaviors impact student engagement (Schlechty, 1994)?

The purpose of the current research is to examine the effectiveness of electronic feedback on student performance and engagement in online courses. Specifically, personalized emails were sent to students about their performance. The results showed that students who responded to the instructor’s emails, which might serve as a proxy for student engagement, had higher grades after the feedback than those who did not respond to the feedback.

Location

Rooms 113 & 115

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 5:00 PM Mar 26th, 6:00 PM

Immediacy Behavior in the Online Classroom: Effects on Student Performance and Engagement

Rooms 113 & 115

Prior research (e.g., Wilson, 2006; Wilson & Taylor, 2001) suggests that immediacy behaviors of instructors are associated with increased grades and satisfaction with both the course and the instructor. The use of immediacy behaviors in the classroom increases student satisfaction and even student grades (Wilson, 2006; Wilson & Taylor, 2001).

Although the effectiveness of immediacy behaviors in the classroom has been well documented, it is not clear how online instructors can make use of these in-class immediacy behaviors. Most immediacy behaviors, such as looking at the class when talking and moving around the classroom when teaching are not transferable to online settings. The question becomes, how can online instructors take advantage of the effectiveness of immediacy behaviors in online, asynchronous, distance learning classes. And, can immediacy behaviors impact student engagement (Schlechty, 1994)?

The purpose of the current research is to examine the effectiveness of electronic feedback on student performance and engagement in online courses. Specifically, personalized emails were sent to students about their performance. The results showed that students who responded to the instructor’s emails, which might serve as a proxy for student engagement, had higher grades after the feedback than those who did not respond to the feedback.