Proposal Title

Using Videotape Lessons to Improve Pre-service Teachers’ Pedagogy: What is the Value and How Best to Evaluate?

Proposal Abstract

At a northern New England university, videotaped lessons of pre-service teachers delivering two mathematics lessons across a semester have been used. Verbatim transcription with inserted comments and goal setting has been the model in implementing this method. With increasing enrollment, verbatim transcription has become unsustainable.

This project investigated whether pre-service teachers: (1) value videotaping as an aid in improving their teaching; (2) improved their pedagogical skill as measured by grades on the two lessons and the number of unmet teaching goals; and (3) if a rubric would be efficient, yet equally effective as transcription.

Fifty-three pre-service teachers participated across 3 years. The first two years, 31 participants received verbatim transcription while in the third year a rubric was instituted with 22 participants.

Descriptive statistics were applied with the following trends found. Pre-service teachers value the video-taped lessons and this tool is effective in improving their instructional delivery. A rubric is as effective as verbatim transcription yet more efficient. Additionally, providing a comprehensive rubric appears to support increased improvement in subsequent lessons. Regardless of the evaluation form used, however, 15 to 18% had a decrease in grade. This group should be explored further to determine patterns and institute interventions.

Location

Rooms 113 & 115

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 25th, 5:00 PM Mar 25th, 6:00 PM

Using Videotape Lessons to Improve Pre-service Teachers’ Pedagogy: What is the Value and How Best to Evaluate?

Rooms 113 & 115

At a northern New England university, videotaped lessons of pre-service teachers delivering two mathematics lessons across a semester have been used. Verbatim transcription with inserted comments and goal setting has been the model in implementing this method. With increasing enrollment, verbatim transcription has become unsustainable.

This project investigated whether pre-service teachers: (1) value videotaping as an aid in improving their teaching; (2) improved their pedagogical skill as measured by grades on the two lessons and the number of unmet teaching goals; and (3) if a rubric would be efficient, yet equally effective as transcription.

Fifty-three pre-service teachers participated across 3 years. The first two years, 31 participants received verbatim transcription while in the third year a rubric was instituted with 22 participants.

Descriptive statistics were applied with the following trends found. Pre-service teachers value the video-taped lessons and this tool is effective in improving their instructional delivery. A rubric is as effective as verbatim transcription yet more efficient. Additionally, providing a comprehensive rubric appears to support increased improvement in subsequent lessons. Regardless of the evaluation form used, however, 15 to 18% had a decrease in grade. This group should be explored further to determine patterns and institute interventions.