Proposal Title

Mediating Apocalypse: Multimodal Learning in a First-Year Writing Seminar

Proposal Abstract

Two professors in English and Speech Communication, along with their three students, will discuss their First-year Writing Seminar "Mediating Apocalypse,” an innovative and popular multi-modal course. Students’ essays will provide evidence-based examples of meeting learning outcomes.

Our panel examines how film and other modalities enhance traditional writing instruction. With a focus on ancient and contemporary accounts of “the end”--from the “Book of Revelation” to recent zombie/world-ending films--the course incorporates close reading, blogging, visual rhetorics, speech, and deliberative inquiry to analyze cultural texts. Students study often polarized and sensationalized discourse around apocalyptic ends such as climate change, viruses, comets, and wars.

Learning outcomes: 1) to help faculty design interdisciplinary, multi-modal writing seminars as scholar-teachers, including undergraduate students in research; 2) to share evidence/results from our course; 3) to connect with faculty/institutions interested in the scholarship of teaching and learning focused on multi-modal writing and crisis rhetorics, both historic and in a worried present.

Location

Room 2002

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 4:00 PM Mar 26th, 4:45 PM

Mediating Apocalypse: Multimodal Learning in a First-Year Writing Seminar

Room 2002

Two professors in English and Speech Communication, along with their three students, will discuss their First-year Writing Seminar "Mediating Apocalypse,” an innovative and popular multi-modal course. Students’ essays will provide evidence-based examples of meeting learning outcomes.

Our panel examines how film and other modalities enhance traditional writing instruction. With a focus on ancient and contemporary accounts of “the end”--from the “Book of Revelation” to recent zombie/world-ending films--the course incorporates close reading, blogging, visual rhetorics, speech, and deliberative inquiry to analyze cultural texts. Students study often polarized and sensationalized discourse around apocalyptic ends such as climate change, viruses, comets, and wars.

Learning outcomes: 1) to help faculty design interdisciplinary, multi-modal writing seminars as scholar-teachers, including undergraduate students in research; 2) to share evidence/results from our course; 3) to connect with faculty/institutions interested in the scholarship of teaching and learning focused on multi-modal writing and crisis rhetorics, both historic and in a worried present.