Proposal Title

An Innovative Approach to Hypothesis-Driven Laboratory Experience

Proposal Abstract

Our purpose is to improve student attitudes toward science and ownership of research projects in Microbiology 3300K courses during the 2014 -2015 academic year. An innovative approach of hypothesis-driven laboratory work that increases undergraduate exposure to authentic research is being implemented. The project, The Small World Initiative (SWI) sponsored by Yale’s Center for Scientific Teaching, involves the discovery and cultivation of novel antibiotic-producing bacteria. The effect of this initiative can be evaluated through both attitudinal assessments and student learning outcomes. We hope to inspire participants to pursue careers in science and develop an appreciation for the scientific process.

It is well established that undergraduate research experiences enrich STEM student learning outcomes. And in our increasing global society, student exposure to issues that affect diverse communities is imperative for career success. Incorporating SWI will significantly contribute to 1) undergraduate research experiences 2) improving student’s perspective of global scientific collaboration 3) enhancing student’s marketable skills and critical-thinking abilities and finally, 4) addressing an urgent global health-crisis (proliferation of antibiotic resistance).

Attendees of this presentation will model our undergraduates’ experience: designing a soil collection/dilution plan, then observing soil isolates for antibiotic activity.

Location

Rooms 113 & 115

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Share

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 5:00 PM Mar 25th, 6:00 PM

An Innovative Approach to Hypothesis-Driven Laboratory Experience

Rooms 113 & 115

Our purpose is to improve student attitudes toward science and ownership of research projects in Microbiology 3300K courses during the 2014 -2015 academic year. An innovative approach of hypothesis-driven laboratory work that increases undergraduate exposure to authentic research is being implemented. The project, The Small World Initiative (SWI) sponsored by Yale’s Center for Scientific Teaching, involves the discovery and cultivation of novel antibiotic-producing bacteria. The effect of this initiative can be evaluated through both attitudinal assessments and student learning outcomes. We hope to inspire participants to pursue careers in science and develop an appreciation for the scientific process.

It is well established that undergraduate research experiences enrich STEM student learning outcomes. And in our increasing global society, student exposure to issues that affect diverse communities is imperative for career success. Incorporating SWI will significantly contribute to 1) undergraduate research experiences 2) improving student’s perspective of global scientific collaboration 3) enhancing student’s marketable skills and critical-thinking abilities and finally, 4) addressing an urgent global health-crisis (proliferation of antibiotic resistance).

Attendees of this presentation will model our undergraduates’ experience: designing a soil collection/dilution plan, then observing soil isolates for antibiotic activity.