Proposal Abstract

This presentation considers: what is required for online education to be a benefit to university and college students? According to research, the two primary markers of success are whether or not the faculty who will teach the courses are in favor of online education and whether they have been trained in its delivery (e.g., Chapman, D. (2011). Contingent and tenured/tenure-track faculty: motivations and incentives to teach distance education, Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, vol. 14, no. 3). Research has further demonstrated that faculty who transition most effectively to teaching online or using technology in their teaching are those who have been trained in both the pedagogy and technology of online learning. This session will engage participants in determining cultural markers that hinder or facilitate the introduction of online teaching and learning in their institutions. While college and university faculties have many things in common, there are also cultural markers that set them apart, just as there are cultural differences among the academic disciplines. Determining which of those cultural predispositions hinder or help faculty to be interested in or excited by the opportunities of online education is crucial to developing a training for faculty that is relevant and useful. Determining which reluctances are primary among a specific faculty will allow a curriculum that begins by addressing those areas. We will then demonstrate a short version of a training using best practices discuss how to address some of the cultural inhibitions raised in the first half of the session.

Location

Room 2005

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 26th, 9:00 AM Mar 26th, 9:45 AM

Best Practices for Entering the Digital Humanities Academic Community: Engaging and Training Faculty

Room 2005

This presentation considers: what is required for online education to be a benefit to university and college students? According to research, the two primary markers of success are whether or not the faculty who will teach the courses are in favor of online education and whether they have been trained in its delivery (e.g., Chapman, D. (2011). Contingent and tenured/tenure-track faculty: motivations and incentives to teach distance education, Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, vol. 14, no. 3). Research has further demonstrated that faculty who transition most effectively to teaching online or using technology in their teaching are those who have been trained in both the pedagogy and technology of online learning. This session will engage participants in determining cultural markers that hinder or facilitate the introduction of online teaching and learning in their institutions. While college and university faculties have many things in common, there are also cultural markers that set them apart, just as there are cultural differences among the academic disciplines. Determining which of those cultural predispositions hinder or help faculty to be interested in or excited by the opportunities of online education is crucial to developing a training for faculty that is relevant and useful. Determining which reluctances are primary among a specific faculty will allow a curriculum that begins by addressing those areas. We will then demonstrate a short version of a training using best practices discuss how to address some of the cultural inhibitions raised in the first half of the session.